Towards the production of transgenic pineapple to control flowering and ripening

Cazzonelli, C., Cavallaro, A. S. and Botella, J. R. (2000). Towards the production of transgenic pineapple to control flowering and ripening. In: S. Subhadrabandhu and P. Chairidchai, Acta Horticulturae: Proceedings of the Third International Pineapple Symposium. 3rd International Pineapple Symposium, Pattaya, Thailand, (115-122). 17-20 November 1998.


Author Cazzonelli, C.
Cavallaro, A. S.
Botella, J. R.
Title of paper Towards the production of transgenic pineapple to control flowering and ripening
Conference name 3rd International Pineapple Symposium
Conference location Pattaya, Thailand
Conference dates 17-20 November 1998
Convener P. Anupunt
Proceedings title Acta Horticulturae: Proceedings of the Third International Pineapple Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Proceedings of the Third International Pineapple Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-90-66059-02-3
ISSN 0567-7527
Editor S. Subhadrabandhu
P. Chairidchai
Volume 529
Issue 529
Start page 115
End page 122
Total pages 8
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In Queensland, pineapple plants are artificially induced to flower by spraying with chemical agents as a standard industry practice; nevertheless an important percentage of plants flower naturally with fruit maturing ahead of the normal summer harvest. This results in the need of extra harvest passes and significantly increases growing costs. In pineapple, ethylene is thought to be responsible for natural flowering due to low temperatures. ACC synthase is the key regulatory enzyme in the biosynthesis of ethylene. Our research team has isolated and characterised an ACC synthase gene induced by cold temperature treatment of pineapple plants followed by an extended warm period. We are producing transgenic pineapple plants carrying sense and antisense copies of the flowering-related ACC synthase gene in order to down-regulate the expression of the gene and therefore suppress natural flowering. Pineapples are not climacteric fruits but nevertheless ethylene is believed to play a significant role during ripening. Important quality traits such as skin texture and colour are linked to the production of ethylene by the fruit. To this aim we have studied pineapple fruit ripening as our model system. We have cloned and characterised several ACC synthase and ACC oxidase genes and have shown for the first time that the two key genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis are induced during pineapple fruit ripening. Transgenic plants containing sense and antisense copies of the ripening-related ACC synthase gene are being produced. We expect to study the effects of suppression of internal ethylene in the transgenic fruits.
Subjects E2
270400 Botany
620205 Tropical fruit
Keyword pineapple
flowering
ripening
ACC synthase
ACC oxidase
genetic engineering
Q-Index Code E2

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Jun 2008, 23:28:49 EST