Sticherus flabellatus (R.Br.) St. John: - A potential new floricultural crop

O'Brien, S., Johnston, M. E. and Williams, R. R. (2000). Sticherus flabellatus (R.Br.) St. John: - A potential new floricultural crop. In: E. Maloupa, Acta Horticulturae: Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Floricultural Crops. 4th International Symposium on New Floricultural Crops, Chania, Crete, (43-47). 22-27 May 1999.


Author O'Brien, S.
Johnston, M. E.
Williams, R. R.
Title of paper Sticherus flabellatus (R.Br.) St. John: - A potential new floricultural crop
Conference name 4th International Symposium on New Floricultural Crops
Conference location Chania, Crete
Conference dates 22-27 May 1999
Convener E. Maloupa
Proceedings title Acta Horticulturae: Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Floricultural Crops   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium On New Floricultural Crops   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2000
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-90-66059-33-7
ISSN 0567-7572
Editor E. Maloupa
Volume 541
Issue 541
Start page 43
End page 47
Total pages 5
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
  Sticherus flabellatus (R.Br.) St. John, common name umbrella fern is currently bush harvested from wild populations in eastern Australia. It is a perennial fern in the family Gleicheniaceae and produces attractive shiny, dark brown stems with contrasting bright green foliage. The fern is used as a foliage filler in floral arrangements in both local and overseas markets. Because of the increasing demand for this product, bush harvesting has increased dramatically and is considered unsustainable. S. flabellatus is difficult to propagate, as are other members of the family Gleicheniaceae. A system of collecting, processing and storage of Sticherus spores has been developed. Spores have been introduced into tissue culture successfully and sporophytes have been produced. Single genotypes have been selected and multiplied. Ex vitro transfer and acclimatisation have yet to be developed. The aim of this research are to domesticate the species, select ‘elite’ forms and introduce them into commercial production. Substantial progress has been achieved.                                               
Subjects E1
300301 Plant Improvement (Selection, Breeding and Genetic Engineering)
620209 Ornamentals, Australian natives and nursery plants
Q-Index Code E1

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Jun 2008, 23:21:37 EST