Do parents' marital circumstances predict young adults' DSM-IV cannabis use disorders? A prospective study

Hayatbakhsh, M. R., Najman, Jake M., Jamrozik, Konrad D., Mamun, Abdullah A. and Alati, Rosa (2006) Do parents' marital circumstances predict young adults' DSM-IV cannabis use disorders? A prospective study. Addiction, 101 12: 1778-1786. doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01620.x

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Author Hayatbakhsh, M. R.
Najman, Jake M.
Jamrozik, Konrad D.
Mamun, Abdullah A.
Alati, Rosa
Title Do parents' marital circumstances predict young adults' DSM-IV cannabis use disorders? A prospective study
Journal name Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0965-2140
Publication date 2006-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01620.x
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 101
Issue 12
Start page 1778
End page 1786
Total pages 9
Editor R. West
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 370504 Family and Household Studies
730205 Substance abuse
C1
Abstract Aims To determine whether parental marital status and marital quality in adolescence are associated with cannabis use disorders in young adults. Design Prospective birth cohort study. Setting A 21-year follow-up of 4815 mothers and their children who participated at 14 years after the child's birth in Queensland, Australia. Participants Cohort of 2303 young adults who completed the life-time version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-computerized version (CIDI-Auto) at the 21-year follow-up. Measurements Young adults' cannabis use disorders were assessed using the CIDI-Auto. Marital status and quality (marital circumstances) and potential confounding factors such as socio-economic status (SES), maternal mental health and maternal substance use were measured when the child was 14 years of age. Findings Marital circumstances of the mother when child was aged 14 years predicted risk of cannabis use disorders in their offspring. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, adolescents who grew up in step-father families were more likely to have cannabis use disorders in early adulthood and a moderate association was found for those children who experienced maternal marital disagreement [odds ratio (OR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0, 2.9]. There was no significant increase in subsequent risk of cannabis use disorders for children whose mothers were unpartnered at 14 years. Conclusions Maternal marital status and marital quality are associated with young adults' subsequent cannabis use disorders. This association is independent of suspected confounding factors measured at 14 years. However, at least part of the association is explained by changes in marital status before 14 years.
Formatted abstract
Aims: To determine whether parental marital status and marital quality in adolescence are associated with cannabis use disorders in young adults.
Design: Prospective birth cohort study.
Setting: A 21 year follow-up of 4815 mothers and their children who participated at 14 years after the child’s birth in Queensland, Australia.
Participants: Cohort of 2303 young adults who completed the life-time version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-computerized version (CIDI-Auto) at the 21-year follow-up.
Measurements: Young adults’ cannabis use disorders were assessed using the CIDI-Auto. Marital status and quality (marital circumstances) and potential confounding factors such as socio-economic status (SES), maternal mental health and maternal substance use were measured when the child was 14 years of age.
Findings: Marital circumstances of the mother when child was 14 years predicted risk of cannabis use disorders in their offspring. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, adolescents who grew up in step-father families were more likely to have cannabis use disorders in early adulthood and a moderate association was found for those children who experienced maternal marital disagreement (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.9). There was no significant increase in subsequent risk of cannabis use disorders for children whose mothers were un-partnered at 14 years.
Conclusions: Maternal marital status and marital quality are associated with young adults’ subsequent cannabis use disorders. This association is independent of suspected confounding factors measured at 14 years. However, at least part of the association is explained by changes in marital status before 14 years.
Keyword cannabis use disorders
marital circumstances
marital status
marital quality
step-father
young adults
Substance Abuse
Psychiatry
Adolescent Substance Use
Family-structure
Drug-use
Mental-health
Divorce
Adjustment
Teenagers
Children
Marriage
Alcohol
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes This is the authors' version of the final paper. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com. Citation of poriginal publication: rances V. O'Callaghan, Michael O'Callaghan, Jake M. Najman, Gail M. Williams, William Bor, Rosa Alati (2006) Prediction of adolescent smoking from family and social risk factors at 5 years, and maternal smoking in pregnancy and at 5 and 14 years Addiction 101 (2) , 282–290 doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01323.x Copyright 2006 Blackwell Publishing. All rights reserved.

 
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Created: Sat, 26 Apr 2008, 00:07:14 EST by Greg Shuttlewood on behalf of Epidemiology and Social Medicine