Ethical and policy issues in the translation of genetic and neuroscience research on addiction

Carter, Adrian and Hall, Wayne (2007). Ethical and policy issues in the translation of genetic and neuroscience research on addiction. In P. M. Miller and D. J. Kavanagh (Ed.), Translation of addictions science into practice (pp. 439-457) Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-008044927-2/50070-5


Author Carter, Adrian
Hall, Wayne
Title of chapter Ethical and policy issues in the translation of genetic and neuroscience research on addiction
Title of book Translation of addictions science into practice
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1016/B978-008044927-2/50070-5
ISBN 9780080449272
Editor P. M. Miller
D. J. Kavanagh
Chapter number 21
Start page 439
End page 457
Total pages 19
Total chapters 22
Language eng
Subjects 321213 Human Bioethics
730205 Substance abuse
B1
1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Neuroscience and genetic research of addiction has the potential to improve the treatment and possibly the prevention of addictive disorders and lead to more humane and effective social policies to deal with persons with these disorders. A balanced appreciation of the value of this research must also consider the possibility that simple-minded policies derived from misrepresentations or misunderstandings of this research may produce unintended harm. In this chapter, we highlight some of the potentially unwelcome uses that may be made of this research with the aim of ensuring that the full benefit of neurobiological research on addiction is realized and potential harms are minimized.
Keyword Substance abuse
Addiction
Ethics
Policy
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Wed, 23 Apr 2008, 00:32:45 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute