Do Childhood Sleeping Problems Predict Obesity in Young Adulthood? Evidence from a Prospective Birth Cohort Study.

Mamun, A.A., Lawlor, D.A., Cramb, S., O'Callaghan, M., Najman, J.M. and Williams, G.M. (2007) Do Childhood Sleeping Problems Predict Obesity in Young Adulthood? Evidence from a Prospective Birth Cohort Study.. American Journal of Epidemiology, 166 12: 1368-1373. doi:10.1093/aje/kwm224


Author Mamun, A.A.
Lawlor, D.A.
Cramb, S.
O'Callaghan, M.
Najman, J.M.
Williams, G.M.
Title Do Childhood Sleeping Problems Predict Obesity in Young Adulthood? Evidence from a Prospective Birth Cohort Study.
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9262
Publication date 2007-01-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwm224
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 166
Issue 12
Start page 1368
End page 1373
Total pages 6
Editor Szklo, M.
Place of publication United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
321202 Epidemiology
730000 - Health
Abstract It has been suggested that sleeping problems are causally associated with obesity in early life, but most studies examining this association have been cross-sectional. The authors used a population-based birth cohort of 2,494 children who were born between 1981 and 1983 in Brisbane, Australia, to examine the prospective association between early-life sleeping problems (at ages 6 months and 2-4 years) and obesity at age 21 years. The authors compared mean body mass indices (BMIs; weight (kg)/height (m)2) and persons in the categories of overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9) and obesity (BMI > or =30) among offspring at age 21 years according to maternally reported childhood sleeping problems. They found that young adult BMI and the prevalence of obesity were greater in offspring who had had sleeping problems at ages 2-4 years than in with those who had not had sleeping problems. These associations were robust to adjustment for a variety of potential confounders, including offspring sex, maternal mental health, and BMI, and several mediators, including adolescent dietary patterns and television-watching. These findings provide some evidence for a long-term impact of childhood sleeping problems on the later development of obesity.
Keyword Adult
Analysis of Variance
Australia/epidemiology
Body Mass Index
Child, Preschool
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Obesity/epidemiology/*etiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk Factors
Sleep Disorders/*complications/epidemiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID G0600705
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 29 Mar 2008, 02:55:06 EST