Self-rated health and a healthy lifestyle are the most important predictors of survival in elderly women

Ford, Jessica, Spallek, Melanie and Dobson , Annette (2008) Self-rated health and a healthy lifestyle are the most important predictors of survival in elderly women. Age and Ageing, 37 2 (Supp): 194-200. doi:10.1093/ageing/afm171


Author Ford, Jessica
Spallek, Melanie
Dobson , Annette
Title Self-rated health and a healthy lifestyle are the most important predictors of survival in elderly women
Journal name Age and Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-0729
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afm171
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 2 (Supp)
Start page 194
End page 200
Total pages 7
Editor Francis, R.
Place of publication England
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
321202 Epidemiology
730203 Health related to ageing
Abstract Objective: to test the hypothesis that morbidity and health related behavioural factors are stronger than social factors as predictors of death among older women. Methods: we used data from 12,422 participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health who were aged 70–75 in 1996. Proportional hazards models of survival up to 31 October 2005 were fitted separately for the whole cohort and those women who were initially in ‘good health’. Results: among the whole cohort, 18.7% died during the follow_up period. The strongest predictor of death was ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ self-rated health (with 52.3% and 28.0%, respectively, of women in these categories dying). Among the women in ‘good health’ at baseline 11.5% died, with current cigarette smoking (hazard ratio HR = 2.19, 95% confidence interval (1.71, 2.81), physical inactivity (HR = 1.45 (1.17, 1.81)), and age (HR = 1.10 (1.04, 1.16) per year) as statistically significant predictors of death. Discussion: among older women, current health and health related behaviours are stronger predictors than social factors of relatively early mortality. Adopting a healthier lifestyle, by doing more exercise and not smoking, is beneficial even in old age.
Keyword self-rated health
survival
elderly women
predictors
elderly
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2008 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 63 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 67 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 29 Mar 2008, 02:48:11 EST