The stress of four commercial farming practices, feeding, counting, grading and harvesting, in farmed rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss

Dunlop, R. A., Laming, P. R. and Smith, T. E. (2004) The stress of four commercial farming practices, feeding, counting, grading and harvesting, in farmed rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss. Marine And Freshwater Behaviour And Physiology, 37 3: 179-192. doi:10.1080/10236240400006133


Author Dunlop, R. A.
Laming, P. R.
Smith, T. E.
Title The stress of four commercial farming practices, feeding, counting, grading and harvesting, in farmed rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss
Journal name Marine And Freshwater Behaviour And Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-181X
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10236240400006133
Volume 37
Issue 3
Start page 179
End page 192
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Language eng
Subject 0707 Veterinary Sciences
Abstract Plasma cortisol concentrations in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used to determine the stress caused by feeding, counting, grading and harvesting. The effect of carrying out these practices with the addition of an aerator was also determined. The cortisol concentration in trout plasma was assessed using enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Pre-feeding levels were found to be 3-4 ng/ml. Feeding, counting, grading and harvesting produced significant elevations in plasma cortisol. The presence of an aerator during these practices significantly reduced this cortisol response. The plasma cortisol response during winter grading was significantly less (p<0.0001) compared to Summer grading. Grading was also found to be a more stressful practice than feeding or counting. The cortisol response to grading was dependent on fish size (p=0.0027). Winter harvesting was more stressful than summer harvesting (p=0.0134), suggesting that lower temperatures may prolong the loss of consciousness. This study suggests that stress incurred by the trout during fish farming practices can be significantly reduced by oxygenating the water.
Keyword Marine & Freshwater Biology
rainbow trout
Oncorhynchus mykiss
stress
cortisol
fish farming
Salmo-gairdneri Richardson
Plasma-cortisol
Handling Stress
2 Strains
Trutta-l
Responses
Tshawytscha
Temperature
Excretion
Transport
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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