Distinct activities of novel neurotoxins from Australian venomous snakes for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

St Pierre, L., Fischer, Harald, Adams, David J., Schenning, M., Lavidis, N., de Jersey, J., Masci, P. P. and Lavin, Martin F. (2007) Distinct activities of novel neurotoxins from Australian venomous snakes for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 64 21: 2829-2840. doi:10.1007/s00018-007-7352-z


Author St Pierre, L.
Fischer, Harald
Adams, David J.
Schenning, M.
Lavidis, N.
de Jersey, J.
Masci, P. P.
Lavin, Martin F.
Title Distinct activities of novel neurotoxins from Australian venomous snakes for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors
Journal name Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1420-682X
1420-9071
Publication date 2007-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00018-007-7352-z
Volume 64
Issue 21
Start page 2829
End page 2840
Total pages 12
Editor Klaus Eichmann
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher Birkhauser Verlag AG
Language eng
Subject 320305 Medical Biochemistry - Proteins and Peptides
320700 Neurosciences
320307 Medical Biochemistry - Other
730106 Cardiovascular system and diseases
C1
Abstract Envenomation from Australian elapid snakes results in a myriad of neurological effects due to post-synaptic neurotoxins that bind and inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of neurons and muscle fibres. However, despite the significant physiological effects of these toxins, they have remained largely undercharacterised at the molecular level. This study describes the identification and comparative analysis of multiple neurotoxin isoforms from ten Australian snakes, including functional characterisation of two of these isoforms, Os SNTX-1. from Oxyuranus scutellatus and the more potent Pt LNTX-1 from Pseudonaja textilis. Electrophysiological recordings from adrenal chromaffin cells demonstrate that both neurotoxins act as competitive antagonists of nAChRs in a concentration-dependent manner. Their effects upon spontaneous and nerve-evoked membrane responses at the amphibian neuromuscular junction provide further evidence that both toxins bind muscle nAChRs in an irreversible manner. Ibis study represents one of the most comprehensive descriptions to date of the sequences and activity of individual Australian elapid neurotoxins.
Keyword Australian elapid snake
Neurotoxin
cDNA cloning
Recombinant protein expression
Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
Venom
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 01:44:24 EST