The importance of functional connectivity in the conservation of a ground-dwelling mammal in an urban Australian landscape

FitzGibbon, S. I., Putland, D. A. and Goldizen, A. W. (2007) The importance of functional connectivity in the conservation of a ground-dwelling mammal in an urban Australian landscape. Landscape Ecology, 22 10: 1513-1525. doi:10.1007/s10980-007-9139-x


Author FitzGibbon, S. I.
Putland, D. A.
Goldizen, A. W.
Title The importance of functional connectivity in the conservation of a ground-dwelling mammal in an urban Australian landscape
Journal name Landscape Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0921-2973
Publication date 2007-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10980-007-9139-x
Volume 22
Issue 10
Start page 1513
End page 1525
Total pages 13
Editor Wu. J.
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
300802 Wildlife and Habitat Management
770503 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract The distribution of the northern brown bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus), a medium-sized ground-dwelling marsupial, was examined in habitat fragments within the urban landscape of the city of Brisbane, Australia. From surveys conducted in 68 fragments, bandicoots were found to be present in 33 (49%) despite widespread habitat loss and fragmentation. Logistic regression analysis revealed that of 13 measured independent variables, functional connectivity was the only factor that significantly predicted the presence of bandicoots within fragments, with connectivity positively correlated with the likelihood of occupation. Functional connectivity was equated to the likelihood of bandicoot immigration into the focal fragment from the nearest occupied fragment, based on the estimated resistance to movement offered by the intervening matrix. Within Brisbane, riparian habitat fragments typically have a relatively high level of functional connectivity, as thin strips of vegetation fringing waterways serve as corridors between larger riparian areas and facilitate the movement of bandicoots between patches. Analyses based on the Akaike Information Criterion revealed that the optimal model based on landscape context variables was convincingly better supported by the data than the optimal model produced from fragment characteristics. However, it is important to examine both internal attributes of habitat fragments and external features of the surrounding landscape when modelling the distribution of ground-dwelling fauna in urban environments, or other landscapes with a highly variable matrix. As urban centres throughout the world expand, it is crucial that the ecology of local wildlife be considered to ensure functional connection is maintained between habitat patches, especially for the conservation of species that are highly susceptible to fragmentation.
Keyword Ecology
Geography, Physical
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
bandicoot
habitat fragmentation
isoodon macrourus
south-east queensland
urbanisation
urban ecology
Patch Isolation Metrics
New-south-wales
Habitat Fragmentation
Forest Fragments
Roads
Terrestrial
Ecology
Birds
Usage
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 01:33:21 EST