Economics and preventing hospital-acquired infection: Broadening the perspective

Graves, Nicholas, Halton, Kate and Lairson, David (2007) Economics and preventing hospital-acquired infection: Broadening the perspective. Infection Control And Hospital Epidemiology, 28 2: 178-184. doi:10.1086/510787

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Author Graves, Nicholas
Halton, Kate
Lairson, David
Title Economics and preventing hospital-acquired infection: Broadening the perspective
Journal name Infection Control And Hospital Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0899-823X
1559-6834
Publication date 2007-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/510787
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 28
Issue 2
Start page 178
End page 184
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Abstract Objective. To present a hypothetical model of the change in economic costs and health benefits to society that result from nosocomial infection control programs. Design. We use a modeling framework to represent how 2 types of costs change with nosocomial infection control programs: costs incurred by the hospital sector and community health services, as well as the private costs to patients. We also demonstrate how to value the health benefits of nosocomial infection control programs, using quality-adjusted life years. Setting. Hypothetical modeling to incorporate the societal perspective. Subjects. A cohort of 50,000 simulated patients at risk of surgical site infection following total hip replacement. Intervention(s). A total of 8 hypothetical interventions that change costs and health outcomes among the cohort by preventing cases of surgical site infection following total hip replacement. Results and Conclusions. We demonstrate that when infection control interventions reduce economic costs and increase health benefits, they should be adopted without further question. If, however, interventions increase economic costs and increase health benefits, then the trade -off between costs and benefits should be examined. Decision-makers should assess the cost per unit of health benefit from infection control programs, consider the impact on health budgets, and compare infection control with alternative uses of scarce healthcare resources.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Infectious Diseases
Cost-effectiveness Analysis
Health-care
Utility Analysis
Nosocomial Infections
Dynamics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 00:54:44 EST