Functional integration of the HUP1 hexose symporter gene into the genome of C. reinhardtii: Impacts on biological H2 production

Doebbe, Anja, Rupprecht, Jens, Beckmann, Julia, Mussgnug, Jan H., Hallmann, Armin, Hankamer, Ben and Kruse, Olaf (2007) Functional integration of the HUP1 hexose symporter gene into the genome of C. reinhardtii: Impacts on biological H2 production. Journal of Biotechnology, 131 1: 27-33. doi:10.1016/j.jbiotec.2007.05.017


Author Doebbe, Anja
Rupprecht, Jens
Beckmann, Julia
Mussgnug, Jan H.
Hallmann, Armin
Hankamer, Ben
Kruse, Olaf
Title Functional integration of the HUP1 hexose symporter gene into the genome of C. reinhardtii: Impacts on biological H2 production
Formatted title
Functional integration of the HUP1 hexose symporter gene into the genome of C.reinhardtii: Impacts on biomass and H2 production
Journal name Journal of Biotechnology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-1656
1873-4863
Publication date 2007-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jbiotec.2007.05.017
Volume 131
Issue 1
Start page 27
End page 33
Total pages 7
Editor A Puehler
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Science
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject C1
270102 Cell Metabolism
660299 Renewable energy not elsewhere classified (e.g. geothermal)
Formatted abstract
Phototrophic organisms use photosynthesis to convert solar energy into chemical energy. In nature, the chemical energy is stored in a diverse range of biopolymers. These sunlight-derived, energy-rich biopolymers can be converted into environmentally clean and CO2 neutral fuels. A select group of photosynthetic microorganisms have developed the ability to extract and divert protons and electrons derived from water to chloroplast hydrogenase(s) to produce molecular H2 fuel. Here, we describe the development and characterization of C. reinhardtii strains, derived from the high H2 production mutant Stm6, into which the HUP1 (hexose uptake protein) hexose symporter from Chlorella kessleri was introduced. The isolated cell lines can use externally supplied glucose for heterotrophic growth in the dark. More importantly, external glucose supply (1mM) was shown to increase the H2 production capacity in strain Stm6Glc4 to ∼150% of that of the high-H2 producing strain, Stm6. This establishes the foundations for a new fuel production process in which H2O and glucose can simultaneously be used for H2 production. It also opens new perspectives on future strategies for improving bio-H2 production efficiency under natural day/night regimes and for using sugar waste material for energy production in green algae as photosynthetic catalysts.
© 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Biotechnology and applied microbiology
Hydrogen
Sun light
Photosynthesis
Glucose transporter
Chlamydomonas
Hygromycin-b
Chlorella
Cotransporter
Proteins
Hydrogen
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 00:42:03 EST