Large water management projects and Schistosomiasis control, Dongting Lake region, China

Li, Yue-Sheng, Raso, Giovanna, Zhao, Zheng-Yuan, He, Yong-Kang, Ellis, Magda K. and McManus, Donald P. (2007) Large water management projects and Schistosomiasis control, Dongting Lake region, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 13 7: 973-979. doi:10.3201/eid1307.070848


Author Li, Yue-Sheng
Raso, Giovanna
Zhao, Zheng-Yuan
He, Yong-Kang
Ellis, Magda K.
McManus, Donald P.
Title Large water management projects and Schistosomiasis control, Dongting Lake region, China
Journal name Emerging Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1080-6040
1080-6059
Publication date 2007-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3201/eid1307.070848
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 7
Start page 973
End page 979
Total pages 7
Place of publication Atlanta, United States
Publisher National Center for Infectious Diseases
Language eng
Subject C1
321202 Epidemiology
730101 Infectious diseases
Abstract Construction of the Three Gorges Dam across the Yangtze River will substantially change the ecology of the Dongting Lake in southern China. In addition, the Chinese Central and Hunan Provinces' governmental authorities have instigated a Return Land to Lake Program that will extend the Dongting Lake surface area from the current 2,681 km(2) to 4,350 km(2) The previous construction of embankments and the large silt deposits made by the Yangtze River and other connecting rivers have contributed to frequent disastrous flooding. As a consequence of the 2 water projects, >2 million persons and their domestic animals are being resettled. This article provides an overview of the historical background of these 2 large water management projects, the associated population movement, and their impact on future transmission and control of schistosomiasis in the Dongting Lake area. The dam will likely substantially extend the range of the snail habitats and increase schistosome transmission and schistosomiasis cases.
Keyword Immunology
Infectious Diseases
Republic of China
Public health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 00:16:19 EST