Cooler temperatures increase sensitivity to ultraviolet B radiation in embryos and larvae of the frog Limnodynastes peronii

van Uitregt, V. O., Wilson, R. S. and Franklin, C. E. (2007) Cooler temperatures increase sensitivity to ultraviolet B radiation in embryos and larvae of the frog Limnodynastes peronii. Global Change Biology, 13 6: 1114-1121. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2007.01353.x


Author van Uitregt, V. O.
Wilson, R. S.
Franklin, C. E.
Title Cooler temperatures increase sensitivity to ultraviolet B radiation in embryos and larvae of the frog Limnodynastes peronii
Formatted title
Cooler temperatures increase sensitivity to ultraviolet B radiation in embryos and larvae of the frog Limnodynastes peronii
Journal name Global Change Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1354-1013
Publication date 2007-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2007.01353.x
Volume 13
Issue 6
Start page 1114
End page 1121
Total pages 8
Editor Long, S.
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
279901 Global Change Biology
270604 Comparative Physiology
770101 Climate change
Abstract Recent studies suggest that complex interacting processes are driving global amphibian declines. Increased ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in the solar spectrum associated with ozone depletion has been implicated in declines, and evidence suggests that the effects of UVB radiation on amphibians may be greater at cooler temperatures. We tested the thermal sensitivity of UVB effects on amphibians in a controlled factorial experiment using the striped marsh frog, Limnodynastes peronii as a model species. We compared survival, growth and locomotor performance of embryonic and larval L. peronii reared under low and high UVB exposures at both 20 and 30 degrees C. Embryonic and larval L. peronii proved extremely sensitive to UVB damage and exhibited greater sensitivity at 20 degrees C compared with 30 degrees C. Embryonic survival to Gosner stage 25 was unaffected by UVB exposure at 30 degrees C, but at 20 degrees C survival was reduced to 52% under high UVB. Larval survival exhibited a similar trend. At 20 degrees C, all tadpoles survived under low UVB, whereas under high UVB there was 100% mortality after 15 days of exposure. At 30 degrees C, 86% survived under low UVB, but only 46% survived under high UVB. Sublethal effects such as, embryonic malformation, retarded larval growth and reduced larval swimming performance were also greater at 20 degrees C compared with 30 degrees C. Our results strongly indicate that UVB damage in amphibians is markedly increased at cooler temperatures. Thus, populations of UVB sensitive species occurring at cold climates may be at greater risk of declines due to increased solar UVB radiation.
Keyword Biodiversity Conservation
Ecology
Environmental Sciences
amphibian decline
Limnodynastes peronii
thermal sensitivity
ultraviolet B radiation
Amphibian Population Declines
Solar Uv-radiation
Tadpoles
Exposure
Growth
Rana
Extinctions
Mortality
Survival
Behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Feb 2008, 03:29:33 EST