Population sizes, site fidelity and residence patterns of Australian snubfin and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins: Implications for conservation

Parra, Guido J., Corkeron, Peter J. and Marsh, Helene (2006) Population sizes, site fidelity and residence patterns of Australian snubfin and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins: Implications for conservation. Biological Conservation, 129 2: 167-180. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2005.10.031


Author Parra, Guido J.
Corkeron, Peter J.
Marsh, Helene
Title Population sizes, site fidelity and residence patterns of Australian snubfin and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins: Implications for conservation
Journal name Biological Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3207
Publication date 2006-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2005.10.031
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 129
Issue 2
Start page 167
End page 180
Total pages 14
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Elsevier Sci Ltd
Language eng
Subject 0602 Ecology
Abstract Very little is known about the ecology of snubfin Orcaella heinsohni and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins Sousa chinensis in Australian waters. We used photo-identification data collected between 1999 and 2002 in Cleveland Bay, northeast Queensland, to estimate abundance, site fidelity and residence patterns of these species in order to make recommendations for their effective conservation and management. Our abundance estimates indicate that less than a hundred individuals of each species inhabit this coastal area. Even with relatively unbiased and precise abundance estimates population trends will be extremely difficult to detect in less than three years unless changes in population size are very high (> 20% p.a.). Though both species are not permanent residents in Cleveland Bay, they both used the area regularly from year to year following a model of emigration and reimmigration. Individuals of both species spend periods of days to a month or more in coastal waters of Cleveland Bay before leaving, and periods of over a month outside the study area before entering the bay again. Because of their small population sizes and movement patterns, snubfin and humpback dolphins are particularly vulnerable to local extinction. our results illustrate that: (1) detection of population trends should not be a necessary criterion for enacting conservation measures of both species in this region, and (2) efforts to maintain viable populations of both species in Cleveland Bay must include management strategies that integrate anthropogenic activities in surrounding areas. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Biodiversity Conservation
Ecology
Environmental Sciences
conservation
marine mammals
population size
movement patterns
Orcaella heinsohni
Sousa chinensis
Bottle-nosed Dolphins
Capture-recapture Experiments
Tursiops-truncatus
Viability Analysis
Power Analysis
Point Lookout
Queensland
Abundance
Habitat
Trends
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 26 Jan 2008, 02:49:03 EST