Between Intent and Achievement in Sector-Wide Approaches: Staking a Claim for Reproductive Health

Hill, Peter S. (2002) Between Intent and Achievement in Sector-Wide Approaches: Staking a Claim for Reproductive Health. Reproductive Health Matters, 10 20: 29-37. doi:10.1016/S0968-8080(02)00082-4


Author Hill, Peter S.
Title Between Intent and Achievement in Sector-Wide Approaches: Staking a Claim for Reproductive Health
Journal name Reproductive Health Matters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0968-8080
Publication date 2002-11-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/S0968-8080(02)00082-4
Volume 10
Issue 20
Start page 29
End page 37
Total pages 9
Editor Berer, M.
Place of publication London
Publisher Elsevier Science
Language eng
Subject 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
C1
321208 Primary Health Care
730307 Health policy evaluation
Abstract Since 1995, sector-wide approaches (SWAps) to health development have significantly influenced health aid to developing countries. SWAps offer guidelines for new partnerships with international donors led by government, new relationships between donors and shared financing, development and implementation of agreed packages of health sector reforms. These structural and funding changes have significant implications for reproductive health. The early experience of SWAps suggests that the extent of donor commitment is constrained for administrative, philosophical and political reasons, with vertical programmes (including those relevant to reproductive health) protecting their 'core' business, and reproductive health, as an integrative concept, lacking strong advocates. Defining the sector in terms of government health systems focuses resources on building effective district health systems, but with uncertain outcomes for elements of reproductive health that depend on multi-sectoral strategies, e.g. safe motherhood. The context of the reforms remains a determining factor in their success, but despite savings available through increased efficiencies and coordinated services, the total per capita expenditure on health to ensure minimum clinical and public health services often remains beyond the budget available to least developed nations. Despite this, many of the elements of SWAps--government leadership, new donor relationships, better coordination, sectoral reform and service integration--offer the potential for more effective and efficient health services, including those for reproductive health.
Keyword Sector-wide Approaches
Reproductive Health Policy And Programmes
Health Sector Reforms
Developing-countries
External Resources
Aid Coordination
Services
Care
Reform
Management
Principles
Population
Cambodia
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Jan 2008, 22:39:24 EST by Thelma Whitbourne on behalf of School of Public Health