Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Recurrent Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Children: An Analysis of Generalization, Maintenance, and Side Effects

Sanders, Matthew R., Rebgetz, Margaret, Morrison, Margaret, Bor, William, Gordon, Amanda, Dadds, Mark and Shepherd, Ross (1989) Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Recurrent Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Children: An Analysis of Generalization, Maintenance, and Side Effects. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 57 2: 294-300. doi:10.1037/0022-006X.57.2.294

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Author Sanders, Matthew R.
Rebgetz, Margaret
Morrison, Margaret
Bor, William
Gordon, Amanda
Dadds, Mark
Shepherd, Ross
Title Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Recurrent Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Children: An Analysis of Generalization, Maintenance, and Side Effects
Journal name Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-006X
Publication date 1989-01-01
Year available 1989
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0022-006X.57.2.294
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 57
Issue 2
Start page 294
End page 300
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, D.C
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Subject 380000 Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences
380100 Psychology
380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract From 10% to 15% of school-aged children experience recurring abdominal pain. This study evaluated the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral program for the treatment of nonspecific recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) using a controlled group design. The multicomponent treatment program consisted of differential reinforcement of well behavior, cognitive coping skills training, and various generalization enhancement procedures. Multiple measures of pain intensity and pain behavior were conducted, including children's self-monitoring, parent observation, teacher observation, and observation by independent observers. Results showed that both the experimental and the control groups reduced their levels of pain. However, the treated group improved more quickly, the effects generalized to the school setting, and a larger proportion of subjects were completely pain-free by 3- months follow-up (87.5% vs. 37.5%). There was no evidence for any negative side effects of treatment.
Keyword recurrent abdominal pain
RAP
generalisation
generalization
maintenance
side- effect
efficacy trial
children
differential reinforcement
coping skills training
pain
self- monitoring
teacher observation
school
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes This is an author version of an article originally published as Matthew R. Sanders, Margaret Rebgetz, Margaret Morrison, William Bor, Amanda Gordon, Mark Dadds, and Ross Shepherd (1989) Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Recurrent Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Children: An Analysis of Generalization, Maintenance, and Side Effects. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 57 2: 294-300 doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.57.2.294. Copyright 1989 American Psychological Association. All rights reserved. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: The Triple P Evidence-Base
 
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Created: Sat, 10 Nov 2007, 00:37:53 EST by Ms Sabine Joachim on behalf of School of Psychology