Provision of taped conversations with neonatologists to mothers of babies in intensive care: randomised controlled trial

Koh, Tieh Hee Hai Guan, Butow, Phyllis N., Coory, Michael, Budge, Donna, Collie, Li-An, Whitehall, John and Tattersall, Martin H. (2007) Provision of taped conversations with neonatologists to mothers of babies in intensive care: randomised controlled trial. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 334 7583: 28-31. doi:10.1136/bmj.39017.675648.BE


Author Koh, Tieh Hee Hai Guan
Butow, Phyllis N.
Coory, Michael
Budge, Donna
Collie, Li-An
Whitehall, John
Tattersall, Martin H.
Title Provision of taped conversations with neonatologists to mothers of babies in intensive care: randomised controlled trial
Journal name BMJ: British Medical Journal
ISSN 0959-535X
0959-8154
1468-5833
Publication date 2007-01-06
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.39017.675648.BE
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 334
Issue 7583
Start page 28
End page 31
Total pages 4
Place of publication London, U. K.
Publisher British Medical Association
Language eng
Subject 321105 Mental Health Nursing
321005 Fetal Development and Medicine
321021 Psychiatry
321099 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Objective: To determine whether providing mothers of babies in neonatal intensive care units with audiotapes of their conversations with a neonatologist improves recall of information and psychological wellbeing.

Design: Randomised, single blinded trial.

Setting: Neonatal intensive care unit, North Queensland, Australia.

Participants: 200 mothers of babies in a neonatal intensive care unit.

Interventions: Mothers given (n=102) or not given (n=98) audiotapes of their conversations with a neonatologist.

Main outcome measures: Recall of information, attitudes to and use of the tape, satisfaction with conversations, postnatal depression, anxiety, general health, and stress about parenting, at 10 days and four and 12 months.

Results: 91% (n=93) of mothers in the tape group listened to the tape (once by day 10, twice by four months, and three times by 12 months; range 1-10). At 10 days and four months, mothers in the tape group recalled significantly more information about diagnosis, treatment, and outcome than mothers in the control group. At four months mothers in the tape group were 75% more likely to recall all of the information about treatment than mothers in the control group (59% v 34%; risk ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.27 to 2.4). Six mothers, all in the control group, could not recall their conversations. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups in satisfaction with conversations (10 days), postnatal depression and anxiety scores (10 days, four and 12 months), and stress about parenting (12 months).

Conclusion: Providing the mothers of babies in neonatal intensive care units with audiotapes of conversations with a neonatologist enhanced their recall of information (up to four months). The taped conversations did not affect the mothers' wellbeing or satisfaction with the neonatologist.

Trial registration: Australian Clinical Trials Registry 12606000478516.
Keyword Anxiety/prevention & control
Depression, postpartum/prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant, newborn
Intensive care, neonatal
Mental recall
Mothers/ psychology
Neonatology
Patient education
Patient satisfaction
Physician-patient relations
Queensland
Tape recording/ supply & distribution
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes Published online 1 December 2006

 
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Created: Fri, 21 Sep 2007, 20:46:00 EST