Tempo and mode in evolution: phylogenetic inertia, adaptation and comparative methods

Blomberg, S. P. and Garland, T. (2002) Tempo and mode in evolution: phylogenetic inertia, adaptation and comparative methods. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 15 6: 899-910. doi:10.1046/j.1420-9101.2002.00472.x


Author Blomberg, S. P.
Garland, T.
Title Tempo and mode in evolution: phylogenetic inertia, adaptation and comparative methods
Journal name Journal of Evolutionary Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1010-061X
1420-9101
Publication date 2002-11-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1046/j.1420-9101.2002.00472.x
Volume 15
Issue 6
Start page 899
End page 910
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 0603 Evolutionary Biology
Abstract Before the Evolutionary Synthesis, 'phylogenetic inertia' was associated with theories of orthogenesis, which claimed that organisms possessed an endogenous perfecting principle. The concept in the modern literature dates to Simpson (1944), who used 'evolutionary inertia' as a description of pattern in the fossil record. Wilson (1975) used 'phylogenetic inertia' to describe population-level or organismal properties that can affect the course of evolution in response to selection. Many current authors now view phylogenetic inertia as an alternative hypothesis to adaptation by natural selection when attempting to explain interspecific variation, covariation or lack thereof in phenotypic traits. Some phylogenetic comparative methods have been claimed to allow quantification and testing of phylogenetic inertia. Although some existing methods do allow valid tests of whether related species tend to resemble each other, which we term 'phylogenetic signal', this is simply pattern recognition and does not imply any underlying process. Moreover, comparative data sets generally do not include information that would allow rigorous inferences concerning causal processes underlying such patterns. The concept of phylogenetic inertia needs to be defined and studied with as much care as 'adaptation'.
Keyword Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Genetics & Heredity
adaptation
comparative methods
constraint
independent contrasts
natural selection
phylogenetic inertia
statistics
Independent Contrasts
Confidence-intervals
Computer-simulation
Sexual Dimorphism
Primates
Constraints
Competition
Selection
Behavior
Limitations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes This document is a journal review.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 20 Sep 2007, 01:45:12 EST