Increased circulating T cell reactivity to GM3 and GQ1b gangliosides in primary progressive multiple sclerosis

Pender, Michael P., Csurhes, Peter A., Wolfe, Nigel P., Hooper, Kaye D., Good, Michael F., McCombe, Pamela A. and Greer, Judith M. (2003) Increased circulating T cell reactivity to GM3 and GQ1b gangliosides in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 10 1: 63-66. doi:10.1016/S0967-5868(02)00270-9

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Author Pender, Michael P.
Csurhes, Peter A.
Wolfe, Nigel P.
Hooper, Kaye D.
Good, Michael F.
McCombe, Pamela A.
Greer, Judith M.
Title Increased circulating T cell reactivity to GM3 and GQ1b gangliosides in primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Journal name Journal of Clinical Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0967-5868
1532-2653
Publication date 2003-01-01
Year available 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0967-5868(02)00270-9
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 10
Issue 1
Start page 63
End page 66
Total pages 4
Editor A. H. Kaye
S. Davis
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Language eng
Subject 320702 Central Nervous System
320207 Autoimmunity
321013 Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
C1
730104 Nervous system and disorders
1103 Clinical Sciences
Abstract We have previously shown that patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) have significantly elevated plasma levels of antibody to GM3 ganglioside compared to patients with relapsing-remitting MS, healthy subjects and patients with other neurological diseases. Anti-GM3 antibody levels were elevated also in patients with secondary progressive MS but to a lesser extent than in primary progressive MS. As gangliosides are particularly enriched in the axonal membrane, these findings suggested that antiganglioside immune responses might contribute to the axonal damage in progressive forms of MS. The present study was performed to determine whether peripheral blood T cell responses to GM3 are also increased in progressive MS. Blood was collected from 98 untreated patients with MS (40 with relapsing-remitting, 27 with secondary progressive and 31 with primary progressive MS), 50 healthy subjects and 24 patients with other disorders of the CNS, and reactivity to GM1, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GD3, GT1b, GQ1b and sulphatide was assessed by 6-day T cell proliferation assays. Increased T cell reactivity to GM3 and GQ1b occurred significantly more often in patients with primary progressive MS than in healthy subjects and patients with other CNS diseases. These findings suggest that ganglioside-specific T cells may contribute to the axonal damage in primary progressive MS. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
We have previously shown that patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) have significantly elevated plasma levels of antibody to GM3 ganglioside compared to patients with relapsing-remitting MS, healthy subjects and patients with other neurological diseases. Anti-GM3 antibody levels were elevated also in patients with secondary progressive MS but to a lesser extent than in primary progressive MS. As gangliosides are particularly enriched in the axonal membrane, these findings suggested that antiganglioside immune responses might contribute to the axonal damage in progressive forms of MS. The present study was performed to determine whether peripheral blood T cell responses to GM3 are also increased in progressive MS. Blood was collected from 98 untreated patients with MS (40 with relapsing-remitting, 27 with secondary progressive and 31 with primary progressive MS), 50 healthy subjects and 24 patients with other disorders of the CNS, and reactivity to GM1, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GD3, GT1b, GQ1b and sulphatide was assessed by 6-day T cell proliferation assays. Increased T cell reactivity to GM3 and GQ1b occurred significantly more often in patients with primary progressive MS than in healthy subjects and patients with other CNS diseases. These findings suggest that ganglioside-specific T cells may contribute to the axonal damage in primary progressive MS.
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd All rights reserved.
Keyword Multiple sclerosis
Neurosciences
Disease progression
Gangliosides
T-lymphocytes
Autoimmunity
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 10 Jun 2004, 10:00:00 EST