From Healing Rituals to Music Therapy: Bridging the Cultural Divide Between Therapist and Young Sudanese Refugees

Jones, Carolyn, Baker, Felicity and Day, Toni (2004) From Healing Rituals to Music Therapy: Bridging the Cultural Divide Between Therapist and Young Sudanese Refugees. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 31 2: 89-100. doi:10.1016/j.aip.2004.02.002

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Author Jones, Carolyn
Baker, Felicity
Day, Toni
Title From Healing Rituals to Music Therapy: Bridging the Cultural Divide Between Therapist and Young Sudanese Refugees
Journal name The Arts in Psychotherapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0197-4556
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aip.2004.02.002
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 89
End page 100
Total pages 12
Editor Flaum, Robin
Smeijsters, Henk
Place of publication Orlandon, USA
Publisher Elsevier Inc.
Language eng
Subject 329903 Therapies and Therapeutic Technology
410101 Music
Abstract In music therapy literature and popular culture alike, music is often hailed as a universal language. It is appropriate then that music therapy is included within the services offered at a high school catering specifically to non-English-speaking students. The music therapy program described in this paper encourages students to explore and express their feelings by playing instruments, singing, writing songs, listening to music and talking about song lyrics. The school is state-run (but federally funded) and provides English language, high school preparation and settlement services to high school aged youth who have recently arrived in Australia from non-English-speaking countries. There are currently 22 nationalities represented amongst the student population, with most students staying no longer than six months before being integrated into mainstream schools with English as a Second Language (ESL) support. While some of the students' families are business migrants, some 60% of students have arrived in Australia as refugees. An increasing proportion (currently 41.6%) originated from The Republic of the Sudan in northern Africa.
Keyword music therapy
refugees
Sudan
cultural divide
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2005 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Music Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 05 Oct 2004, 10:00:00 EST by Elizabeth Jordan on behalf of School of Music