Campfire culture and computer culture: Museums of the present

Lawe Davies, Chris, Connelly, Brian and Obijiofor, Levi (2003). Campfire culture and computer culture: Museums of the present. In: G. Tremblay, Panam: industries culturelles et dialogue des civilisations dans les Amériques. Panamerican Colloquium: Cultural Industries and Dialogue between Civilizations in the Americas, Montreal, Canada, (557-571). 22-24 April 2002.


Author Lawe Davies, Chris
Connelly, Brian
Obijiofor, Levi
Title of paper Campfire culture and computer culture: Museums of the present
Conference name Panamerican Colloquium: Cultural Industries and Dialogue between Civilizations in the Americas
Conference location Montreal, Canada
Conference dates 22-24 April 2002
Proceedings title Panam: industries culturelles et dialogue des civilisations dans les Amériques
Place of Publication Montreal, Canada
Publisher Presses de l'Universite de Laval
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 2763779824
9782763779829
Editor G. Tremblay
Start page 557
End page 571
Total pages 15
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In Australia indigenous peoples have never had a treaty with the dominant cultures; and their on-going marginalisation is some testimony to this. However, they have not languished entirely in a policy free environment: media is one area where some policy advances have been made; but media policy development has experienced a number of problems. It has tended to be monolithic in a situation demanding multi and complex treatments. And funding, as always, never seems sufficient to meet those multi and complex needs. This paper examines a small remote community on the island of Milingimbi off the northern coast of Arnhem Land in Australia's far north. People in East Arnhem Land refer to themselves collectively as Yolngu. This community is not typical of many documented cases of media relations between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples; however, the fact that it tends to overturn much of the conventional scholarship surrounding indigenous peoples and the media, helps shed new light on the inadequacy of not only monolithic media policy, but the inadequacy of media-only approaches to policy. Arguably, the significance of the media in Milingimbi is part of a 'triangulated' relationship between indigenous and dominant cultures. That triangulation also involves appropriate forms of government and education, which coupled with appropriate media appear to offer new ways of seeing self-government alongside relative cultural and economic autonomy.
Subjects EX
751005 Communication across languages and cultures
400104 Communication and Media Studies
2001 Communication and Media Studies
Keyword Aboriginal Australians
Indigenous culture
Media policy
Milingimbi
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 12:44:28 EST