Effects of electrical muscle stimulation on energy expenditure

Hayter, T., Knez, W. L., Brancato, T. and Coombes, J. S. (2003). Effects of electrical muscle stimulation on energy expenditure. In: K. B. Pandolf, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise: American College of Sports Medicine 50th Annual Meeting Abstracts. 50th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A, (S181-S181). 28-31 May, 2003.


Author Hayter, T.
Knez, W. L.
Brancato, T.
Coombes, J. S.
Title of paper Effects of electrical muscle stimulation on energy expenditure
Conference name 50th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine
Conference location San Francisco, CA, U.S.A
Conference dates 28-31 May, 2003
Proceedings title Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise: American College of Sports Medicine 50th Annual Meeting Abstracts   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Publication Year 2003
ISSN 0195-9131
Editor K. B. Pandolf
Volume 35
Issue 5 Suppl.
Start page S181
End page S181
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
PURPOSE
Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) devices are being marketed as weight/fat loss devices. Commercially available stimulators have the ability to evoke large muscle contractions that may affect energy expenditure while the device is being used. The aim of this study was to test the effects of two commercially available EMS devices on oxygen consumption at rest.

METHODS
Twenty subjects participated in two trials on two different EMS devices. Ten used the Abtronic and ten used the Feminique. The Abtronic consists of a panel containing two electrodes that can be placed over various muscle groups and is attached using a Velcro strap. The Feminique consists of ten electrodes which enables multiple muscles to be contracted simultaneously with belts securing electrodes in position. Subjects arrived for testing after an overnight fast, had the devices fitted and then positioned supine with expired air measured to determine oxygen consumption. After a ten minute acclimation period, oxygen consumption was measured for 20 minutes with the device switched off (resting) then 20 minutes with the device switched on (stimulated).

RESULTS
There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in oxygen consumption between resting and stimulated with either the Abtronic (mean ± SD, resting 4.40 ± 0.44, stimulated 3.45 ± 0.53 ml O2/kg/min) or the Feminique (resting 3.73 ± 0.45, stimulated 3.75 ± 0.46 ml O2/kg/min).

CONCLUSION

In summary, the EMS devices tested had no effect on energy expenditure during muscle stimulation.
©2003The American College of Sports Medicine

Subjects EX
321401 Exercise Physiology
730213 Preventive medicine
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Keyword Equipment Apparatus Devices and Instrumentation
Metabolism
Methods and Techniques
Muscular System (Movement and Support)
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 10:29:18 EST