Can we get General Practitioners to Promote Physical Activity? Results of the 10,000 Steps Rockhampton Community-Based Physical Activity Promotion Project

Eakin, Elizabeth, Larsen, Emma, Mummery, Kerry and Brown, Wendy (2003). Can we get General Practitioners to Promote Physical Activity? Results of the 10,000 Steps Rockhampton Community-Based Physical Activity Promotion Project. In: T. Shilton, Active Living - All Together Better: National Physical Activity Conference 2003 Abstracts. Active Living - All Together Better: National Physical Activity Conference 2003, Fremantle, Western Australia, (26-26). 12-14 November, 2003.


Author Eakin, Elizabeth
Larsen, Emma
Mummery, Kerry
Brown, Wendy
Title of paper Can we get General Practitioners to Promote Physical Activity? Results of the 10,000 Steps Rockhampton Community-Based Physical Activity Promotion Project
Conference name Active Living - All Together Better: National Physical Activity Conference 2003
Conference location Fremantle, Western Australia
Conference dates 12-14 November, 2003
Proceedings title Active Living - All Together Better: National Physical Activity Conference 2003 Abstracts
Place of Publication Subiaco, Western Australia
Publisher Physical Activity Taskforce
Publication Year 2003
Editor T. Shilton
Start page 26
End page 26
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Evidence supporting the efficacy of physical activity promotion in primary care settings has evaluated patient-level changes in physical activity, with little focus on the issue of general practitioner (GP) uptake. The 'GP Strategy' of 10,000 Steps Rockhampton provided an opportunity to explore this issue in the context of a multi-strategy, community-based physical activity intervention project. The 'GP Strategy' was developed in partnership with the Capricornia Division of General Practice. It aimed to: 1) increase GP awareness of the 10,000 Steps project, 2) upskill GPs in brief physical activity counselling techniques, and 3) provide GPs with evidencebased physical activity counselling materials and pedometers. The evaluation, which was guided by the RE-AIM evaluation framework, used a pre-post design, including a GP mailed survey, and collection of process data. Survey response rates were 67% (n=44/66; baseline) and 70% (n=37/53; 14-month follow-up). GP awareness of 10,000 Steps Rockhampton increased from 46% to 97%. 21/23 practices were visited by 10,000 Steps staff and accepted 10,000 Steps posters, brochures, and pedometers. At follow-up, 78% had displayed the poster, 81% were using the brochures, and 70% had loaned pedometers to patients. Despite the very high rate of uptake and use of 10,000 Steps materials, there was no change in the percentage of patients counselled, and relatively few pedometers had been loaned to patients. The results of this trial indicate that it will take more effort to change GP physical activity counselling behaviour, and provide only modest support for use of pedometers in the busy general practice setting. Acknowledgement:This project is supported by a grant from Health Promotion Queensland.
Subjects EX
730301 Health education and promotion
111712 Health Promotion
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 10:27:16 EST