Logistical aspects of large telemedicine networks. 2: Measurement of network activity

Wootton, Richard, Smith, Anthony C., Gormley, Sinead and Patterson, Jessica (2002). Logistical aspects of large telemedicine networks. 2: Measurement of network activity. In: Richard Wootton, Journal of Telemedicine And Telecare. Proceedings of: Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 2. Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 2, Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, (81-82). 1-2 August, 2002. doi:10.1258/13576330260440961


Author Wootton, Richard
Smith, Anthony C.
Gormley, Sinead
Patterson, Jessica
Title of paper Logistical aspects of large telemedicine networks. 2: Measurement of network activity
Conference name Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 2
Conference location Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane
Conference dates 1-2 August, 2002
Proceedings title Journal of Telemedicine And Telecare. Proceedings of: Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 2   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication London, U. K.
Publisher Royal Society of Medicine Press
Publication Year 2002
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1258/13576330260440961
ISSN 1357-633X
1758-1109
Editor Richard Wootton
Volume 8
Issue Supp. 3
Start page 81
End page 82
Total pages 2
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Abstract/Summary We carried out a retrospective review of the videoconference activity records in a university-run hospital telemedicine studio. Usage records describing videoconferencing activity in the telemedicine studio were compared with the billing records provided by the telecommunications company. During a seven-month period there were 211 entries in the studio log: 108 calls made from the studio and 103 calls made from a far-end location. We found that 103 calls from a total of 195 calls reported by the telecommunications company were recorded in the usage log. The remaining 92 calls were not recorded, probably for one of several reasons, including: failed calls-a large number of unrecorded calls (57%) lasted for less than 2 min (median 1.6 min); origin of videoconference calls-calls may have been recorded incorrectly in the usage diary (i.e. as being initiated from the far end, when actually initiated from the studio); and human error. Our study showed that manual recording of videoconference activity may not accurately reflect the actual activity taking place. Those responsible for recording and analysing videoconference activity, particularly in large telemedicine networks, should do so with care.
Subjects E1
329999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
730199 Clinical health not specific to particular organs, diseases and conditions
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 01:44:17 EST