Representing part-whole relationships in conceptual modeling: An empirical evaluation

Shanks, Graeme, Tansley, Elizabeth, Nuredini, Jasmina, Tobin, Daniel and Weber, Ron (2002). Representing part-whole relationships in conceptual modeling: An empirical evaluation. In: L. Applegate, R. Galliers and J. I. deGross, IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering: Proceedings of the Twenty-Third International Conference on Information Systems. 23rd International Conference on Information Systems: ICIS 2002, Barcelona, Spain, (89-100). 15-18 December, 2002.


Author Shanks, Graeme
Tansley, Elizabeth
Nuredini, Jasmina
Tobin, Daniel
Weber, Ron
Title of paper Representing part-whole relationships in conceptual modeling: An empirical evaluation
Conference name 23rd International Conference on Information Systems: ICIS 2002
Conference location Barcelona, Spain
Conference dates 15-18 December, 2002
Proceedings title IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering: Proceedings of the Twenty-Third International Conference on Information Systems   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Piscataway, N.J, U.S.A.
Publisher IEEE Educational Activities Department
Publication Year 2002
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 1041-4347
Editor L. Applegate
R. Galliers
J. I. deGross
Volume 17
Issue 11
Start page 89
End page 100
Total pages 12
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The part-of or part-whole construct is a fundamental element of many conceptual modeling grammars that is used to associate one thing (a component) with another thing (a composite). Substantive theoretical issues surrounding the part-whole construct remain to be resolved, however. For instance, contrary to widespread claims, the relationship between components and composites is not always transitive. Moreover, how the partwhole construct should be represented in a conceptual schema diagram remains a contentious issue. Some analysts argue composites should be represented as a relationship or association. Others argue they should be represented as an entity. In this paper we use an ontological theory to support our arguments that composites should be represented as entities and not relationships or associations. We also describe an experiment that we undertook to test whether representing composites as relationships or entities enables users to understand a domain better. Our results support our arguments that using entities to represent composites enables users to better understand a domain.
Subjects E1
280111 Conceptual Modelling
700199 Computer software and services not elsewhere classified
Keyword Conceptual modeling
Information Systems Development
ontology
part-of relationship
aggregation
composition
meronymic relations
mereology
mereotopology
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Aug 2007, 00:54:46 EST