A Rough Trade: How Artisan Ironworkers Mediated Architectural Modernism. A Case Study of Early Steel Framed Architecture, The 1897 Wesleyan Church, Darwin

Green, Kevin (2002). A Rough Trade: How Artisan Ironworkers Mediated Architectural Modernism. A Case Study of Early Steel Framed Architecture, The 1897 Wesleyan Church, Darwin. In: J. P. Macarthur and A. Moulis, Additions to architectural history : Nineteenth annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Additions to Architectural History, XIXth Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Brisbane, Qld, Australia, (). 4-7 October, 2002.

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Author Green, Kevin
Title of paper A Rough Trade: How Artisan Ironworkers Mediated Architectural Modernism. A Case Study of Early Steel Framed Architecture, The 1897 Wesleyan Church, Darwin
Conference name Additions to Architectural History, XIXth Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Conference location Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Conference dates 4-7 October, 2002
Proceedings title Additions to architectural history : Nineteenth annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Publication Year 2002
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 1864996471
Editor J. P. Macarthur
A. Moulis
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In 2001 the former Methodist church at the corner of Knuckey and Mitchell streets in Darwin NT, was dismantled, refurbished and re-erected on a new site in the Darwin Botanic Gardens. As well as being the oldest surviving church building in Darwin, it is a unique example of nineteenth century prefabricated steel framed building. The building was first erected at the Knuckey St. site in 1897. It was manufactured at a time when artisan craftsmen worked new materials of iron and steel with highly evolved handicraft skills, but had begun to make increasing use of machine tools. This continuation of artisan production into the late machine age, places it at odds with the process of modernisation Giedion describes in Mechanisation Takes Command and raises questions about the manner in which the application of the steel frame 'modernised' architecture.
Subjects 310000 Architecture, Urban Environment and Building
Keyword modernism
iron
Darwin
churches
steel frame
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Jul 2005, 10:00:00 EST by Kevin J. Green on behalf of Faculty of Arts