Body composition of ambulatory children with mild cerebral palsy

Bell, K. L. and Davies, P. S. W. (2003). Body composition of ambulatory children with mild cerebral palsy. In: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia. 27th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of Australia, Hobart, Australia, (S57-S57). 30 November - 3 December 2003.


Author Bell, K. L.
Davies, P. S. W.
Title of paper Body composition of ambulatory children with mild cerebral palsy
Conference name 27th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of Australia
Conference location Hobart, Australia
Conference dates 30 November - 3 December 2003
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Clayton, Vic.
Publisher Blackwell Science Asia
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
ISSN 0964-7058
1440-6047
Volume 12
Issue Supp.
Start page S57
End page S57
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background -
Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are frequently shorter and lighter than their non-disabled peers and have alterations in body composition. Bioelectrical impedance is a quick, straightforward technique for the measurement of total body water (TBW).

Objective -
To determine differences in TBW, FFM and percent body fat (%BF) between mildly affected children with CP and non-disabled controls. Design - Cross sectional, observational study of 18 ambulatory children with CP (10 males) and 21 similarly aged non-disabled controls (12 males). Height and weight were measured using standard calibrated equipment. Impedance was measured using the Bodystat 1500. TBW was calculated from impedance. FFM was determined from TBW using hydration constants.

Outcomes -
No biologically or statistically significant differences were found between the children with CP and the control group for any of the measures of body size or composition.

Conclusions -

These data suggest that short stature and poor nutritional status are not inevitable in children with CP.
Subjects 321019 Paediatrics
730215 Nutrition
Q-Index Code CX

 
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Created: Thu, 23 Aug 2007, 14:40:49 EST