Randomised clinical trial of a group parent education programme for Australian Indigenous families

Turner, Karen M. T., Richards, Mary and Sanders, Matthew R. (2007) Randomised clinical trial of a group parent education programme for Australian Indigenous families. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 43 6: 429-437. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1754.2007.01053.x

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Author Turner, Karen M. T.
Richards, Mary
Sanders, Matthew R.
Title Randomised clinical trial of a group parent education programme for Australian Indigenous families
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-4810
1440-1754
Publication date 2007-06-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2007.01053.x
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 43
Issue 6
Start page 429
End page 437
Total pages 9
Editor F. Oberklaid
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2008
Language eng
Subject 380107 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Formatted abstract
Aim:
Parenting programmes have been shown to improve children’s adjustment and reduce problem behaviour; however, little research has addressed outcomes for Indigenous families. The aim of this project was to assess the impact and cultural appropriateness of a parenting programme tailored for Indigenous families, an adaptation of the evidence-based Group Triple P – Positive Parenting Program.

Methods:
A repeated measures randomised group design methodology was used, comparing the intervention with a waitlist control condition pre- and post-intervention, with a 6-month follow-up of the intervention group.

Results:
Parents attending Group Triple P reported a significant decrease in rates of problem child behaviour and less reliance on some dysfunctional parenting practices following the intervention in comparison to waitlist families. The programme also led to greater movement from the clinical range to the non-clinic range for mean child behaviour scores on all measures. Effects were primarily maintained at 6-month follow-up. Qualitative data showed generally positive responses to the programme resources, content and process. However, only a small number of waitlist families subsequently attended groups, signalling the importance of engaging families when they first make contact, helping families deal with competing demands, and offering flexible service delivery so families can resume contact when circumstances permit.

Conclusions:
This study provides empirical support for the effectiveness and acceptability of a culturally tailored approach to Group Triple P conducted by Child Health and Indigenous Health workers in a community setting. The outcomes of this trial may be seen as a significant step in increasing appropriate service provision for Indigenous families and reducing barriers to accessing available services in the community.
Keyword Behavioural family intervention
Cultural tailoring
Indigenous child health
Indigenous health worker
Parent group
Group Triple P
Indigenous Triple P
Level 4 Evidence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Summary and Author Version attached.

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 46 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 22 Aug 2007, 22:56:17 EST by Dr James Kirby on behalf of School of Psychology