Self-efficacy and task performance: An investigation from two levels of analysis and specificity

Neal, A. and Yeo, G. (2005). Self-efficacy and task performance: An investigation from two levels of analysis and specificity. In: 5th UQ Symposium on Organisational Psychology, Emmanuel College, University of Queensland, (115-115). 4 June 2005.


Author Neal, A.
Yeo, G.
Title of paper Self-efficacy and task performance: An investigation from two levels of analysis and specificity
Conference name 5th UQ Symposium on Organisational Psychology
Conference location Emmanuel College, University of Queensland
Conference dates 4 June 2005
Journal name Australian Journal of Psychology: Combined Abstracts of 2005 Psychology Conferences   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Basingstoke, UK
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 0004-9530
Volume 57
Issue Supplement
Start page 115
End page 115
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This research adopts a resource allocation theoretical framework to generate predictions regarding the relationship between self-efficacy and task performance from two levels of analysis and specificity. Participants were given multiple trials of practice on an air traffic control task. Measures of task-specific self-efficacy and performance were taken at repeated intervals. The authors used multilevel analysis to demonstrate dynamic main effects, dynamic mediation and dynamic moderation. As predicted, the positive effects of overall task specific self-efficacy and general self-efficacy on task performance strengthened throughout practice. In line with these dynamic main effects, the effect of general self-efficacy was mediated by overall task specific self-efficacy; however this pattern emerged over time. Finally, changes in task specific self-efficacy were negatively associated with changes in performance at the within-person level; however this effect only emerged towards the end of practice for individuals with high levels of overall task specific self-efficacy. These novel findings emphasise the importance of conceptualising self-efficacy within a multi-level and multi-specificity framework and make a significant contribution to understanding the way this construct relates to task performance.
Subjects 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Keyword Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes The Abstracts of the 5th UQ Symposium on Organisational Psychology.

 
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Created: Sun, 19 Aug 2007, 20:20:22 EST