Influence of music genre and composition on entertainment noise limits

Hayne, Michael J., Mee, David J. and Rumble, Ron (2005). Influence of music genre and composition on entertainment noise limits. In: McMinn, Terrance, Proceedings of: Acoustics 2005: acoustics in a changing environment. Acoustics 2005: Acoustics in a Changing Environment, Busselton, Western Australia, (217-224). 9-11 November, 2005.

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Author Hayne, Michael J.
Mee, David J.
Rumble, Ron
Title of paper Influence of music genre and composition on entertainment noise limits
Conference name Acoustics 2005: Acoustics in a Changing Environment
Conference location Busselton, Western Australia
Conference dates 9-11 November, 2005
Proceedings title Proceedings of: Acoustics 2005: acoustics in a changing environment
Place of Publication Castlemaine, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian Acoustical Society
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780909882235
0909882231
Editor McMinn, Terrance
Start page 217
End page 224
Total pages 8
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Liquor licensing authorities across Australia typically require an entertainment noise test to be conducted before a venue can host amplified entertainment. The purpose of this test is to simulate live entertainment in order to determine the maximum permissible noise source limits allowed for the venue. In this paper, several disadvantages of the current method used for entertainment noise testing are identified and discussed. It was found that the choice of music can affect the resulting source noise level limits. An alternative approach has been suggested which involves playing band-limited pink noise across the 63 to 2kHz octave bands. A correction is then applied to determine the source noise level limits associated with different genres of music. The advantages of this method are that it reduces the time required to conduct the test, the nuisance caused to neighbouring premises is reduced and the variance in source noise level limits caused by different choice of test music is eliminated.
Subjects 240501 Acoustics and Acoustical Devices; Waves
E1
290501 Mechanical Engineering
Keyword Entertainment noise
Acoustics
Music
References Bauer, B. B. (1970) Octave-band spectral distribution of recorded music, Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, Vol. 18, pp. 165-170. Greiner, R.R. and Eggers, J. (1989) The spectral amplitude distribution of selected compact discs, Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, Vol. 37(4), pp. 246-275. Liquor Licensing Division (LLD) (2005) Guideline for Acoustic Consultants when Assessing Amplified Music orVoice Associated with Entertainment at Premises Licensed under the Liquor Act 1992, Compliance Unit, Liquor Licensing Division, Brisbane. Pachet, F. and Cazaly, D. (2000) A taxonomy of music genre, Content-Based Multimedia Information Access Conference (RIAO), Paris, April 2000. Silian, L.J., Dunn, H.K. and White, S.D. (1931) Absolute amplitudes and spectra of certain musical instruments and orchestras, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 2, pp. 330-371.
Q-Index Code E1

 
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Created: Mon, 20 Mar 2006, 10:00:00 EST by David J Mee on behalf of School of Engineering