Macromolecular interactions during gelatinisation and retrogradation in starch-whey systems as studied by rapid visco-analyser

Sopade, P. A., Hardin, M. T., Fitzpatrick, S., Desmee, H. and Halley, P. J. (2006) Macromolecular interactions during gelatinisation and retrogradation in starch-whey systems as studied by rapid visco-analyser. International Journal of Food Engineering, 2 4: 1-17. doi:10.2202/1556-3758.1074

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Author Sopade, P. A.
Hardin, M. T.
Fitzpatrick, S.
Desmee, H.
Halley, P. J.
Title Macromolecular interactions during gelatinisation and retrogradation in starch-whey systems as studied by rapid visco-analyser
Journal name International Journal of Food Engineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-3758
2194-5764
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2202/1556-3758.1074
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 2
Issue 4
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publisher Walter de Gruyter
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Abstract Gelatinisation and retrogradation of starch-whey mixtures were studied in water (pH 7) using the Rapid Visco-Analyser (RVA). The starch:whey ratios ranged from 0:100 - 100:0. Wheat starch, and whey protein concentrate (about 80% solids basis) and isolate (about 96% solids basis) were used. Mixtures with whey isolates were generally more viscous than those with whey concentrates, and this was attributed to fewer non-protein milk components in the former. Whey protein concentrates and isolates reduced the peak, trough and final viscosities of the mixtures, but the breakdown and setback ratios of the mixtures were increased. The gelatinisation temperature increased with whey substitutions indicating that whey protein delayed starch gelatinisation. The temperature of fastest viscosity development decreased as the amount of whey was increased. Whey protein isolate generally exercised a lesser effect than the concentrate. At between 40 - 50% whey substitutions, the dominant phase changed from starch to protein irrespective of the source of the whey protein. An additive law poorly defined selected RVA parameters. Both macromolecules interacted to define the viscosity of the mixture, and an exponential model predicted the viscosity better than the additive law. The results obtained in this study are discussed to assist the understanding of extrusion processing of starch-whey systems as models for whey-fortified snack and ready-to-eat foods. Copyright ©2006 The Berkeley Electronic Press. All rights reserved.
Keyword High-protein low-carbohydrate foods
Ready-to-eat (RTE)
RVA
Snack foods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 11:03:16 EST