Dominance hierarchies and health: Constructing personal zones of spiritual power and healing in modern medicine

Hutch, Richard (2006) Dominance hierarchies and health: Constructing personal zones of spiritual power and healing in modern medicine. Journal of Religion & Health, 45 3: 328-345. doi:10.1007/s10943-006-9036-7

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Author Hutch, Richard
Title Dominance hierarchies and health: Constructing personal zones of spiritual power and healing in modern medicine
Journal name Journal of Religion & Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-4197
1573-6571
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10943-006-9036-7
Volume 45
Issue 3
Start page 328
End page 345
Total pages 18
Editor D. Leeming
Place of publication United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
440208 Psychology of Religion
780199 Other
440299 Religion and Religious Traditions not elsewhere classified
Abstract Ethological studies of animals in groups and sociobiology indicate that hierarchies of dominance amongst some species ensure the survival of the group. When transferred to human groups, dominance hierarchies suggest a crucial role played by recasting the scope of such hierarchies of dominant and subordinate members to included hyper-dominant beings. A recognition of such beings as even more dominant than the socially dominant members of a hierarchy facilitates the empowerment of the socially subordinate members. Religious belief and practice works to establish such hyper-dominant beings (gods, goddesses, and so forth) as superior members of human groups. Doing so is a means of ensuring the survival of the species and, thus, enhancing healing and human health. The doctor-patient relationship is examined from such a point of view, with an emphasis on whether the hierarchy created by the relationship allows consideration of alternative and complementary forms of medical treatment.
Keyword Religion
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Spirituality
Healing
Ethology
Dominance
Medicine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 21:02:21 EST