A new instrument for targeting falls prevention interventions was accurate and clinically applicable in a hospital setting

Haines, Terry P., Bennell, Kim L., Osborne, Richard H. and Hill, Keith D. (2006) A new instrument for targeting falls prevention interventions was accurate and clinically applicable in a hospital setting. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 59 2: 168-175.


Author Haines, Terry P.
Bennell, Kim L.
Osborne, Richard H.
Hill, Keith D.
Title A new instrument for targeting falls prevention interventions was accurate and clinically applicable in a hospital setting
Journal name Journal of Clinical Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0895-4356
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2005.07.017
Volume 59
Issue 2
Start page 168
End page 175
Total pages 8
Editor A. Knottnerus
P. Tugwell
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
321007 Geriatrics and Gerontology
730203 Health related to ageing
Abstract Background and Objective: To describe the diagnostic accuracy and practical application of the Peter James Centre Falls Risk Assessment Tool (PJC-FRAT), a multidisciplinary falls risk screening and intervention deployment instrument. Methods: In phase 1, the accuracy of the PJC-FRAT was prospectively compared to a gold standard (the STRATIFY) on a cohort of subacute hospital patients (n = 122). In phase 2, the PJC-FRAT was temporally reassessed using a subsequent cohort (n = 316), with results compared to those of phase 1. Primary outcomes were falls (events), fallers (patients who fell), and hospital completion rates of the PJC-FRAT. Results: In phase 1, PJC-FRAT accuracy of identifying falters showed sensitivity of 73% (bootstrap 95% confidence interval CI = 55, 90) and specificity of 75% (95% CI = 66, 83), compared with the STRATIFY (cutoff >= 2/5) sensitivity of 77% (95% CI = 59, 92) and specificity of 51% (95% CI = 41, 61). This difference was not significant. In phase 2, accuracy of nursing staff using the PJC-FRAT was lower. PJC-FRAT completion rates varied among disciplines over both phases: nurses and physiotherapists, >= 90%; occupational therapists, >= 82%; and medical officers, >= 57%. Conclusion: The PJC-FRAT was practical and relatively accurate as a predictor of falls and a deployment instrument for falls prevention interventions, although continued staff education may be necessary to maintain its accuracy. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Accidental Falls
Hospitals
Sensitivity And Specificity
Assessment
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Risk-assessment
Diagnostic-test
Patient
Curves
Cohort
Model
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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