Expression of p53 tumor suppressor protein in sun-exposed skin and associations with sunscreen use and time spent outdoors: A community-based study

van der Pols, Jolieke C., Xu, Chunxia, Boyle, Glen M., Parsons, Peter G., Whiteman, David C. and Green, Adele C. (2006) Expression of p53 tumor suppressor protein in sun-exposed skin and associations with sunscreen use and time spent outdoors: A community-based study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 163 11: 982-988. doi:10.1093/aje/kwj137


Author van der Pols, Jolieke C.
Xu, Chunxia
Boyle, Glen M.
Parsons, Peter G.
Whiteman, David C.
Green, Adele C.
Title Expression of p53 tumor suppressor protein in sun-exposed skin and associations with sunscreen use and time spent outdoors: A community-based study
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9262
1476-6256
Publication date 2006-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwj137
Volume 163
Issue 11
Start page 982
End page 988
Total pages 7
Editor M. Szklo
Place of publication Baltimore, MD, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 321203 Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
730117 Skin and related disorders
321015 Oncology and Carcinogenesis
270201 Gene Expression
270206 Genetic Immunology
Abstract The p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene that is commonly mutated in skin cancer and sun-exposed skin, and this can be detected through immunohistochemical expression of the p53 protein. The authors hypothesized that time spent outdoors is associated with p53 protein expression in human skin and that sunscreen use counteracts the association. In 1996, they investigated this in a community-based cross-sectional study in Australia. Detailed information about skin type, time spent outdoors, and sunscreen use was collected from 139 residents of a subtropical township who also provided a skin biopsy from the back of the hand for measurement of p53 expression. Increasing time spent outdoors was positively associated with immuno reactivity in the whole epidermis and in the basal layer of the epidermis. After adjustment for confounders, p53 immunoreactivity was twice as high for people who used sunscreen 1 or 2 days per week as for those who used sunscreen daily (whole epidermis: ratio estimate = 2.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 3.6; basal layer: ratio estimate = 1.7, 95% confidence interval: 0.9, 3.1). The authors conclude that p53 immunoreactivity in the skin is a marker of exposure to ultraviolet light in the past 6 months, but this may be mitigated by regular application of sunscreen.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Immunohistochemistry
Sunscreening Agents
Tumor Suppressor Protein P53
Ultraviolet Rays
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 10:42:38 EST