Effects of iron additions on filament growth and productivity of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula

Ahern, K. S., ONeil, J. M., Udy, J. W. and Albert, S. (2006) Effects of iron additions on filament growth and productivity of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula. Marine And Freshwater Research, 57 2: 167-176. doi:10.1071/MF05022


Author Ahern, K. S.
ONeil, J. M.
Udy, J. W.
Albert, S.
Title Effects of iron additions on filament growth and productivity of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula
Journal name Marine And Freshwater Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-1650
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MF05022
Volume 57
Issue 2
Start page 167
End page 176
Total pages 10
Editor Dugald McGlashan
Place of publication Australia
Publisher CSIRO
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
290899 Civil Engineering not elsewhere classified
780199 Other
Abstract The bioavailability of iron, in combination with essential macronutrients such as phosphorus, has been hypothesised to be linked to nuisance blooms of the toxic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula. The present laboratory study used two biological assay techniques to test whether various concentrations of added iron (inorganic and organically chelated) enhanced L. majuscula filament growth and productivity (C-14-bicarbonate uptake rate). Organically chelated iron (FeEDTA) with adequate background concentrations of phosphorus and molybdenum caused the largest increases (up to 4.5 times the control) in L. majuscula productivity and filament growth. The addition of inorganic iron (without added phosphorus or molybdenum) also stimulated L. majuscula filament growth. However, overall the FeEDTA was substantially and significantly more effective in promoting L. majuscula growth than inorganic iron (FeCl3). The organic chelator (EDTA) alone and molybdenum alone also enhanced L. majuscula growth but to a lesser extent than the chelated iron. The results of the present laboratory study support the hypothesis that iron and chelating organic compounds may be important in promoting blooms of L. majuscula in coastal waters of Queensland, Australia.
Keyword Fisheries
Limnology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Oceanography
Algal Blooms
Feedta
Molybdenum
Moreton Bay
Nutrients
Organics
Natural Organic-matter
Impregnated Filter-paper
Nitrogen-fixation
Marine Cyanobacterium
Trichodesmium Cyanophyceae
Estuarine Gradient
Phosphorus
Coastal
Phytoplankton
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 10:39:00 EST