No more free beer tomorrow? Economic policy and outcomes in Australia and New Zealand since 1984

Hazledine, Tim and Quiggin, John (2006) No more free beer tomorrow? Economic policy and outcomes in Australia and New Zealand since 1984. Australian Journal of Political Science, 41 2: 145-159. doi:10.1080/10361140600672402

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Author Hazledine, Tim
Quiggin, John
Title No more free beer tomorrow? Economic policy and outcomes in Australia and New Zealand since 1984
Journal name Australian Journal of Political Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1036-1146
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10361140600672402
Volume 41
Issue 2
Start page 145
End page 159
Total pages 15
Editor Ian McAllister
Rachel Gibson
Place of publication UK
Publisher Routledge Taylor and Francis Group
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
360102 Comparative Government and Politics
750699 Government and politics not elsewhere classified
CX
Abstract There are no controlled experiments in macroeconomic policy, nor in systematic programs of microeconomic reform, but a comparison between New Zealand and Australia over the period since 1984 provides as close an approach to such an experiment as is ever likely to be possible. From quite similar starting points the two countries pursued liberal reform programs that differed sharply, mainly as a result of exogenous differences in constitutional structures and the personal styles of the central actors. Australia followed a more cautious, piecemeal, consensus-based approach, whereas New Zealand, in contrast, adopted a radical, rapid, 'purist' platform. The NZ reform package was generally seen by contemporary commentators as representing a 'textbook' model for best practice reform. However, Australia since 1984 has performed much better than New Zealand, whose per capita GDP growth indeed ranked at or near the bottom of the OECD. In this paper, we assess a variety of explanations for the divergences in policies and outcomes.
Keyword Political Science
Reform
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Economics Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 10:30:39 EST