The importance of out-group acceptance in addition to in-group support in predicting the well-being of same-sex attracted youth

Dane, Sharon (2005) The importance of out-group acceptance in addition to in-group support in predicting the well-being of same-sex attracted youth. Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review, 1 1: 23-29.

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Author Dane, Sharon
Title The importance of out-group acceptance in addition to in-group support in predicting the well-being of same-sex attracted youth
Journal name Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1833-4512
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 23
End page 29
Total pages 7
Editor Damien W. Riggs
Place of publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject CX
380105 Social and Community Psychology
759999 Other social development and community services
Formatted abstract
Studies investigating the well-being of same-sex attracted youth have generally not distinguished between the role of support from friends sharing their minority status and the role of acceptance from areas outside these friendships. To address this issue, 127 (67 female, 60 male) same-sex attracted youth aged 18 to 25 years were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire examining the role of out-group acceptance in predicting the psychological wellbeing of these youth, over and above that afforded by support from members of their own minority group. Perceived acceptance of their sexual orientation from heterosexual friends, heterosexual contacts apart from friends (such as neighbours, co-workers, employers, or teachers), and from their mother significantly added to the prediction of these youth’s wellbeing, while controlling for perceived support from their sexual minority friends. These findings are discussed in relation to the unique barriers sexual minorities face to in-group socialisation.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:49:20 EST