A community-based wildlife survey: the knowledge and attitudes of residents of suburban Brisbane, with a focus on bandicoots

Fitzgibbon, S. I. and Jones, D. N. (2006) A community-based wildlife survey: the knowledge and attitudes of residents of suburban Brisbane, with a focus on bandicoots. Wildlife Research, 33 3: 233-241.


Author Fitzgibbon, S. I.
Jones, D. N.
Title A community-based wildlife survey: the knowledge and attitudes of residents of suburban Brisbane, with a focus on bandicoots
Journal name Wildlife Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1035-3712
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/WR04029
Volume 33
Issue 3
Start page 233
End page 241
Total pages 9
Editor Camilla Myers
Place of publication Collingwood
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
300802 Wildlife and Habitat Management
770503 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract Within the expanding city of Brisbane in south-east Queensland, numerous fragments of native and regrowth vegetation are scattered across the largely urbanised landscape. These fragments provide refuge to a great diversity of native wildlife, and, provide residents with the opportunity to experience nature on their doorstep. To assess the diversity and abundance of this wildlife, recent changes in these parameters, and the value of wildlife and bushland fragments to residents of Brisbane, a questionnaire survey was distributed to 300 households each located adjacent to one of 38 urban bushland fragments. A total of 172 surveys (57%) were returned, producing 768 records of 83 fauna species, dominated by birds and mammals; bandicoots were widely reported from the 38 fragments. Several historical records provided evidence of recent local extinctions within fragments, highlighting the continuing declines in various species of native wildlife within Brisbane. Several human-wildlife conflicts were identified, but overall residents were tolerant of such conflicts. Bandicoots were disliked by a small minority (3%) of residents owing to the holes they dig in lawns and gardens in search of food. and their potential as vectors of ticks. Most respondents expressed ail appreciation for the presence of native wildlife (96%) and bushland fragments (97%) in their local area, emphasising the importance of incorporating human dimension values into the management of this urban biodiversity.
Keyword Ecology
Zoology
South-east Queensland
Extinction Debt
Urban Wildlife
Felis-catus
Conservation
Population
Habitat
Koala
Q-Index Code C1

 
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