Using epidemiological models to estimate the health effects of diet behaviour change: the example of tailored fruit and vegetable promotion

Veerman, J. L., Barendregt, J. J., Mackenbach, J. P. and Brug, J. (2006) Using epidemiological models to estimate the health effects of diet behaviour change: the example of tailored fruit and vegetable promotion. Public Health Nutrition, 9 4: 415-420. doi:10.1079/PHN2005873


Author Veerman, J. L.
Barendregt, J. J.
Mackenbach, J. P.
Brug, J.
Title Using epidemiological models to estimate the health effects of diet behaviour change: the example of tailored fruit and vegetable promotion
Journal name Public Health Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-9800
Publication date 2006-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1079/PHN2005873
Volume 9
Issue 4
Start page 415
End page 420
Total pages 6
Editor Marilyn Tseng
Barry Margetts
Place of publication Cambridge
Publisher Cambridge Univ Press
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
321202 Epidemiology
730306 Evaluation of health outcomes
Abstract Objective: To explore the use of epidemiological modelling for the estimation of health effects of behaviour change interventions, using the example of computer-tailored nutrition education aimed at fruit and vegetable consumption in The Netherlands. Design: The effects of the intervention on changes in consumption were obtained from an earlier evaluation study. The effect on health outcomes was estimated using an epidemiological multi-state life table model. input data for the model consisted of relative risk estimates for cardiovascular disease and cancers, data on disease occurrence and mortality, and survey data on the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Results: if the computer-tailored nutrition education reached the entire adult population and the effects were sustained, it could result in a mortality decrease of 0.4 to 0.7% and save 72 to 115 life-years per 100000 persons aged 25 years or older. Healthy life expectancy is estimated to increase by 32.7 days for men and 25.3 days for women. The true effect is likely to lie between this theoretical maximum and zero effect, depending mostly on durability of behaviour change and reach of the intervention. Conclusion: Epidemiological models can be used to estimate the health impact of health promotion interventions.
Keyword Fruits And Vegetables
Evaluation
Modelling
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Nutrition & Dietetics
Nutrition Education
Impact
Program
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:27:29 EST