Tradeoffs of different types of species occurrence data for use in systematic conservation planning

Rondinini, C., Wilson, K. A., Boitani, L., Grantham, H. and Possingham, H. P. (2006) Tradeoffs of different types of species occurrence data for use in systematic conservation planning. Ecology Letters, 9 10: 1136-1145. doi:10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00970.x


Author Rondinini, C.
Wilson, K. A.
Boitani, L.
Grantham, H.
Possingham, H. P.
Title Tradeoffs of different types of species occurrence data for use in systematic conservation planning
Journal name Ecology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-023X
1461-0248
Publication date 2006-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00970.x
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 10
Start page 1136
End page 1145
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 0501 Ecological Applications
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050205 Environmental Management
050209 Natural Resource Management
050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management
Abstract Data on the occurrence of species are widely used to inform the design of reserve networks. These data contain commission errors (when a species is mistakenly thought to be present) and omission errors (when a species is mistakenly thought to be absent), and the rates of the two types of error are inversely related. Point locality data can minimize commission errors, but those obtained from museum collections are generally sparse, suffer from substantial spatial bias and contain large omission errors. Geographic ranges generate large commission errors because they assume homogenous species distributions. Predicted distribution data make explicit inferences on species occurrence and their commission and omission errors depend on model structure, on the omission of variables that determine species distribution and on data resolution. Omission errors lead to identifying networks of areas for conservation action that are smaller than required and centred on known species occurrences, thus affecting the comprehensiveness, representativeness and efficiency of selected areas. Commission errors lead to selecting areas not relevant to conservation, thus affecting the representativeness and adequacy of reserve networks. Conservation plans should include an estimation of commission and omission errors in underlying species data and explicitly use this information to influence conservation planning outcomes.
Keyword Commission Error
Geographic Range
Omission Error
Point Data
Predicted Distribution Data
Reserve Selection
Ecology
Reserve Selection Procedures
Cape Floristic Region
Distribution Models
Biodiversity Hotspots
Detection Probabilities
Ecological Transition
Survey Intensity
Habitat Models
South-africa
Bias
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:25:42 EST