Temperature and the respiratory properties of whole blood in two reptiles, Pogona barbata and Emydura signata

Stawski, Clare Y., Grigg, Gordon C., Booth, David T. and Beard, Lyn A. (2006) Temperature and the respiratory properties of whole blood in two reptiles, Pogona barbata and Emydura signata. Comparative Biochemistry And Physiology A-molecular & Integrative Physiology, 143 2: 173-183. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2005.11.014


Author Stawski, Clare Y.
Grigg, Gordon C.
Booth, David T.
Beard, Lyn A.
Title Temperature and the respiratory properties of whole blood in two reptiles, Pogona barbata and Emydura signata
Formatted title
Temperature and the respiratory properties of whole blood in two reptiles, Pogona barbata and Emydura signata
Journal name Comparative Biochemistry And Physiology A-molecular & Integrative Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-6433
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cbpa.2005.11.014
Volume 143
Issue 2
Start page 173
End page 183
Total pages 11
Place of publication New York
Publisher Elsevier Science Inc
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
270603 Animal Physiology - Systems
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract We investigated the capacity of two reptiles, an agamid lizard Pogona barbata and a chelid turtle Emydura signata, to compensate for the effects of temperature by making changes in their whole blood respiratory properties. This was accomplished by measuring the P-50 (at 10, 20 and 30 degrees C), hematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) in field acclimatised and laboratory acclimated individuals. The acute effect of temperature on P50 in P barbata, expressed as heat of oxygenation (Delta H), ranged from -16.8 +/- 1.84 to -28.5 +/- 2.73 kJ/mole. P-50 of field acclimatised P barbata increased significantly from early spring to summer at the test temperatures of 20 degrees C (43.1 +/- 1.2 to 48.8 +/- 2.1 mmHg) and 30 degrees C (54.7 +/- 1.2 to 65.2 +/- 2.3 mmHg), but showed no acclimation under laboratory conditions. For E. signata, Delta H ranged from -31.1 +/- 6.32 to -48.2 +/- 3.59 kJ/mole. Field acclimatisation and laboratory acclimation of P-50 did not occur. However, in E. signata, there was a significant increase in [Hb] and MCHC from early spring to summer in turtles collected from the wild (1.0 +/- 0.1 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 mmol/L and 4.0 +/- 0.3 to 6.7 +/- 0.7 mmol/L, respectively). (C) 2005 Published by Elsevier Inc.
Keyword Acclimation
Blood Oxygen Affinity
Blood Respiratory Properties
Emydura Signata
Oxygen Equilibrium Curve
Pogona Barbata
Seasonal Adaptation
Temperature Effects
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Physiology
Zoology
Oxygen-binding-properties
Cell Organic-phosphates
Fresh-water Turtle
Body-temperature
Transport
Affinity
Hemoglobin
Thermoregulation
Lizards
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:18:23 EST