Season of birth is associated with anthropometric and neurocognitive outcomes during infancy and childhood in a general population birth cohort

McGrath, J. J., Saha, S., Lieberman, D. E. and Buka, S. (2006) Season of birth is associated with anthropometric and neurocognitive outcomes during infancy and childhood in a general population birth cohort. Schizophrenia Research, 81 1: 91-183. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2005.07.017


Author McGrath, J. J.
Saha, S.
Lieberman, D. E.
Buka, S.
Title Season of birth is associated with anthropometric and neurocognitive outcomes during infancy and childhood in a general population birth cohort
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0920-9964
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2005.07.017
Volume 81
Issue 1
Start page 91
End page 183
Total pages 93
Editor H. A. Nasrallah
L. E. Delisi
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Bv
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
321204 Mental Health
730211 Mental health
Abstract The 'season of birth' effect is one of the most consistently replicated associations in schizophrenia epidemiology. In contrast, the association between season of birth and development in the general Population is relatively poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of season of birth on various anthropometric and neurocognitive variables from birth to age seven in a large, community-based birth cohort. A sample of white singleton infants born after 37 weeks gestation (n =22,123) was drawn from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. Anthropometric variables (weight, head circumference, length/height) and various measures of neurocognitive development, were assessed at birth, 8 months, 4 and 7 years of age. Compared to surnmer/autumn born infants, winter/spring born infants were significantly longer at birth, and at age seven were significantly heavier, taller and had larger head circumference. Winter/spring born infants were achieving significantly higher scores on the Bayley Motor Score at 8 months, the Graham-Ernhart Block Test at age 4, the Wechsler Intelligence Performance and Full Scale scores at age 7, but had significantly lower scores on the Bender-Gestalt Test at age 7 years. Winter/spring birth, while associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, is generally associated with superior outcomes with respect to physical and cognitive development. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Psychiatry
Seasons
Birth Weight
Anthropometry
Human Development
Vitamin D
Vitamin-d Deficiency
Cognitive Function
Weight
Schizophrenia
Disorder
Intelligence
Temperature
Growth
Brain
Risk
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 19:12:43 EST