Reproduction elevates the corticosterone stress response in common fruit bats

Klose, S. M., Smith, C. L., Denzel, A. J. and Kalko, E. K. V. (2006) Reproduction elevates the corticosterone stress response in common fruit bats. Journal of Comparative Physiology A: sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, 192 4: 341-350. doi:10.1007/s00359-005-0067-4


Author Klose, S. M.
Smith, C. L.
Denzel, A. J.
Kalko, E. K. V.
Title Reproduction elevates the corticosterone stress response in common fruit bats
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology A: sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0340-7594
1432-1351
Publication date 2006-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00359-005-0067-4
Volume 192
Issue 4
Start page 341
End page 350
Total pages 10
Editor Friedrich G. Barth
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
270603 Animal Physiology - Systems
780105 Biological sciences
0606 Physiology
1109 Neurosciences
1116 Medical Physiology
Formatted abstract
Changes in reproductive state or the environment may affect the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-andrenal (HPA) axis. However, little is known about the dynamics of the resulting corticosteroid stress response, in particular in tropical mammals. In this study, we address the modulation of corticosterone release in response to different reproductive conditions and seasonality in 326 free-living common fruit-eating bats (Artibeus jamaicensis) on Barro Colorado Island in Panama during dry and wet seasons. We present strong evidence that stress sensitivity is primarily modulated by reproductive condition. In reproductively active females, corticosterone increases were more rapid and reached higher levels, but also decreased significantly faster than in inactive females. The corticosterone response was weaker in reproducing males than in females and delayed compared to non-reproductive males. Testes volume in reproductively active males was negatively correlated with corticosterone concentrations. Our findings suggest differentiated dynamics in the corticosterone stress response between sexes, potentially reflecting conflicting ecological demands. In females, a strong acute corticosterone response may represent high stress- and risk-sensitivity that facilitates escape and thus helps to protect reproduction. In males, suppression during reproductive activity could reflect lowered stress sensitivity to avoid chronically elevated corticosterone levels in times of frequent aggressive and therefore costly inter-male encounters.
© Springer-Verlag 2005.
Keyword Glucocorticoids
Reproduction
Behaviour
Phyllostomidae
Chiroptera
Behavioral sciences
Neurosciences
Physiology
Zoology
Life-history evolution
Seasonal-changes
Artibeus-jamaicensis
Trade-offs
Adrenocortical responses
Neotropical bat
Passerine birds
Base-line
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:11:06 EST