A Survey of Cultivars and Management Practices in Australian Persimmon Orchards

Nissen, R. J., George, A. P., Broadley, R. H. and Collins, R. J. (2003). A Survey of Cultivars and Management Practices in Australian Persimmon Orchards. In: R. J. Collins, Acta Horticulturae: Proceedings of the Second International Persimmon Symposium. 2nd International Persimmon Symposium, Queensland, Australia, (179-186). 10-13 September, 2000.

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Author Nissen, R. J.
George, A. P.
Broadley, R. H.
Collins, R. J.
Title of paper A Survey of Cultivars and Management Practices in Australian Persimmon Orchards
Conference name 2nd International Persimmon Symposium
Conference location Queensland, Australia
Conference dates 10-13 September, 2000
Proceedings title Acta Horticulturae: Proceedings of the Second International Persimmon Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Proceedings of the 2nd International Persimmon Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
ISBN 9789066059269
ISSN 0567-7572
Editor R. J. Collins
Volume 1
Issue 601
Start page 179
End page 186
Total pages 7
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Three surveys were conducted to determine the most commonly used cultivars and management practices across Australia. The persimmon industry is established from the semi-tropical far north of Queensland to the cool temperate zones of Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia. Fruit from warmer regions mature four months earlier, giving a harvest spread from February to June inclusive. The majority of the Australian industry is based on the non-astringent cultivar Fuyu. Only 26% of Australian orchards are planted with pollinizers. Yield and fruit size vary within and between regions. Factors contributing to lower yields and smaller size grades are temperature, salinity, pollination, and training and management systems. The most common tree training system is the freestanding vase, followed by palmette, the V- and Tatura trellises. Ruakura trellis is the least used. Trellised trees produce higher yields of marketable fruit through increased planting density, improved light interception and a tree structure that stabilises against tree movement, significantly reducing fruit blemish.
Subjects 300302 Plant Growth and Development
E1
300399 Horticulture not elsewhere classified
620299 Horticultural crops not elsewhere classified
Keyword Australia
management practices
persimmon
astringent
training systems
pollination
salinity
References George, A.P. Collins, R.J. and Mowat, A.D. 1996. Factors affecting blemishing of persimmon in New Zealand and Australia. Proceedings of the First International Persimmon Symposium. Acta Horticulturae, 436: 171-178. Collins, R.J. 1989. Developing the non-astringent persimmon industry as a new industry for Australia. PhD thesis. University of Queensland, Australia.
Q-Index Code E1
Additional Notes II International Persimmon Symposium. This document is abstract only. The full text is available to subscribers from http://www.actahort.org/books/601/601_24.htm

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Aug 2006, 10:00:00 EST by Raymond J Collins on behalf of School of Integrative Systems