Rehabilitating degraded forest land in central Vietnam with mixed native species plantings

McNamara, Sean, Tinh, Duong Viet, Erskine, Peter D., Lamb, David, Yates, David and Brown, Sharon (2006) Rehabilitating degraded forest land in central Vietnam with mixed native species plantings. Forest Ecology And Management, 233 2-3: 358-365. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2006.05.033


Author McNamara, Sean
Tinh, Duong Viet
Erskine, Peter D.
Lamb, David
Yates, David
Brown, Sharon
Title Rehabilitating degraded forest land in central Vietnam with mixed native species plantings
Journal name Forest Ecology And Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-1127
Publication date 2006-09-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foreco.2006.05.033
Volume 233
Issue 2-3
Start page 358
End page 365
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Science Bv
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
270704 Landscape Ecology
770703 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract This paper examines the use of Acacia as a nurse crop to overcome some of the ecological and economic impediments to reforestation of degraded areas dominated by grasses including Imperata cylindrica. The study site at Hai Van Pass in central Vietnam was initially reforested using Acacia auriculiformis. After 8 years these stands were thinned and under-planted with Hopea odorata, Dipterocarpus alatus, Parashorea chinensis, Tarrietia javanica, Parashorea stellata, Scaphium lychnophorum, Peltophorum dasyrhachis var. tonkinensis and other high-value native species. At the time of field assessment (early 2004), the Acacia trees were aged between 16 and 18 years and basal area ranged from 9 to 13 m(2) ha(-1) after several thinnings. Acacias facilitated the establishment of native species, but after 6-7 years of growth, further thinning is needed to maintain growth rates. In addition to assisting the establishment of native species, the Acacia nurse crop should provide a revenue stream (NPV about US$ 180, or IRR 19%) sufficient to cover the establishment costs of the underplanted native species (about US$ 100). (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V.
Keyword Acacia
Fire
Under-planting
Shade Requirements
Reforestation
Hopea Odorata
Imperata Cylindrical
Nurse Crop
Forestry
Biodiversity
Restoration
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:10:22 EST