'Please Mr Hay, what are my poss(abilities)?': Legitimation of ability through physical education practices

Hay, Peter .J. and lisahunter (2006) 'Please Mr Hay, what are my poss(abilities)?': Legitimation of ability through physical education practices. Sport Education and Society, 11 3: 293-310. doi:10.1080/13573320600813481

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Author Hay, Peter .J.
lisahunter
Title 'Please Mr Hay, what are my poss(abilities)?': Legitimation of ability through physical education practices
Journal name Sport Education and Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-3322
Publication date 2006-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13573320600813481
Volume 11
Issue 3
Start page 293
End page 310
Total pages 18
Editor J. Evans
Place of publication Abingdon, U.K.
Publisher Routledge Journals
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
330103 Sociology of Education
749906 Education policy
Abstract This paper provides two vignettes that draw on data from projects that interrogate how a student can be positioned by practices within physical education (PE) and directed by the PE teacher in relation to their valued or legitimated ability. Through the use of Pierre Bourdieu's conceptual tools of field, habitus and capital we investigate the complex legitimation processes that shape student poss(abilities) and that are situated in the space of the PE class. The first vignette is from the perspective of a student and draws on data from interviews, a journal, questionnaires and photos of her PE experiences in upper primary and lower secondary school. The second vignette focuses on teacher practices and his constitution of the field of a PE class highlighting the significance of teacher perspectives of 'ability' in informing assessment in senior secondary PE. Using these examples we discuss the symbolic violence that works against each student by positioning them as 'less able' or 'unable' despite their participation in a learning context. We argue that by not attending to the possible abilities of students that could have been recognized, developed and legitimated, and through the misuse of capital assignment by teachers, PE may well be counterproductive to students' ongoing engagement with the subject area and the espoused potential upon which such a subject area justifies itself.
Keyword Sport Sciences
Education & Educational Research
Ability
Capital
Symbolic Violence
Opportunity
Assessment
Habitus
Bourdieu
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 09:05:23 EST