Modelling optical micro-machines

Loke, Vincent L. Y., Nieminen, Timo A., Branczyk, Agata M., Heckenberg, Norman R. and Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina (2006). Modelling optical micro-machines. In: Nikolai Voshchinnikov, ELS 9: 9th International Conference on Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Non-Spherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications: Book of abstracts. 9th International Conference on Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Non-Spherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications, St. Petersburg, Russia, (163-166). 5-9 June 2006.

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Author Loke, Vincent L. Y.
Nieminen, Timo A.
Branczyk, Agata M.
Heckenberg, Norman R.
Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina
Title of paper Modelling optical micro-machines
Conference name 9th International Conference on Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Non-Spherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications
Conference location St. Petersburg, Russia
Conference dates 5-9 June 2006
Proceedings title ELS 9: 9th International Conference on Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Non-Spherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications: Book of abstracts
Place of Publication St Petersburg, Russia
Publisher St Petersburg State University Press
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor Nikolai Voshchinnikov
Volume Online
Start page 163
End page 166
Total pages 4
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A strongly focused laser beam can be used to trap, manipulate and exert torque on a microparticle. The torque is the result of transfer of angular momentum by scattering of the laser beam. The laser could be used to drive a rotor, impeller, cog wheel or some other microdevice of a few microns in size, perhaps fabricated from a birefringent material. We review our methods of computationally simulating the torque and force imparted by a laser beam. We introduce a method of hybridizing the T-matrix with the Finite Difference Frequency Domain (FDFD) method to allow the modelling of materials that are anisotropic and inhomogeneous, and structures that have complex shapes. The high degree of symmetry of a microrotor, such as discrete or continuous rotational symmetry, can be exploited to reduce computational time and memory requirements by orders of magnitude. This is achieved by performing calculations for only a given segment or plane that is repeated across the whole structure. This can be demonstrated by modelling the optical trapping and rotation of a cube.
Subjects 240504 Electrostatics and Electrodynamics
240400 Optical Physics
0205 Optical Physics
Keyword Optical tweezers
Optical torque
References [1] M. I. Mishchenko, Light scattering by randomly oriented axially symmetric particles, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8, 871 (1991) [2] Nieminen et al, Calculation of the T-matrix: general considerations and application of the point-matching method, Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 79-80 1019-1029 (2003) [3] Timo A. Nieminen, Norman R. Heckenberg and Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Computational modelling of optical tweezers, Proc. SPIE 5514, 514-523 (2004) [4] J. D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics, 3rd ed. New York: Wiley, 1998. [5] K. S. Yee, Numerical solution of initial boundary value problems involving Maxwell's equations in isotropic media, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat. 14, 302-307, (1966)
Q-Index Code E1
Additional Notes Extended abstract

 
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Created: Tue, 01 Aug 2006, 10:00:00 EST by Timo Nieminen on behalf of Faculty of Science