Effects of Lyngbya majuscula (Cyanophycea) blooms on sediment nutrients and meiofaunal assemblages in seagrass beds in Moreton Bay, Australia

Garcia, Rosa and Johnstone, Ron W. (2006) Effects of Lyngbya majuscula (Cyanophycea) blooms on sediment nutrients and meiofaunal assemblages in seagrass beds in Moreton Bay, Australia. Marine and Freshwater Research, 57 2: 155-165. doi:10.1071/MF05053


Author Garcia, Rosa
Johnstone, Ron W.
Title Effects of Lyngbya majuscula (Cyanophycea) blooms on sediment nutrients and meiofaunal assemblages in seagrass beds in Moreton Bay, Australia
Journal name Marine and Freshwater Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-1650
1448-6059
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MF05053
Volume 57
Issue 2
Start page 155
End page 165
Total pages 11
Editor Dugald McGlashan
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic., Australia
Publisher CSIRO
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
270702 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
770300 Marine Environment
0405 Oceanography
0602 Ecology
0704 Fisheries Sciences
Abstract Blooms of Lyngbya majuscula have been increasingly recorded in the waters of Moreton Bay, on the south-east coast of Queensland, Australia. The influences of these blooms on sediment infauna and the implications for sediment biogeochemical processes was studied. Sediment samples were taken from Moreton Bay banks during and after the bloom season. The deposition of L. majuscula seems to be responsible for the higher total Kjedahl nitrogen (TKN) concentrations measured during the bloom period. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations did not change. Lyngbya majuscula blooms had a marked influence on the meiobenthos. Nematodes, copepods and polychaetes were the most abundant groups of meiofauna, and the bloom produced a decrease in the abundance and a change in the sediment depth distribution of these organisms. The distribution of nematodes, copepods and polychaetes in sediment became shallower. Further, the bloom did not affect the abundance and distribution of polychaetes as strongly as it did copepods and nematodes. The changes observed in the distribution of meiofauna in the sediment during the bloom period indicate that L. majuscula produces oxygen depletion in sediments, and that different fauna seem to be affected to different degrees.
Keyword Meiofauna
Toxic Bloom
Fisheries
Limnology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Oceanography
Benthic Meiofauna
Baltic Sea
Community Structure
Organic Enrichment
Marine Ecosystems
Food-web
Indicators
Pollution
Impact
Eutrophication
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:41:34 EST