Does evening removal of urinary catheters shorten hospital stay among general hospital patients?: a randomized controlled trial

Webster, Joan, Osborne, Sonya, Woollett, Kaylene, Shearer, Julie, Courtney, Mary and Anderson, Debra (2006) Does evening removal of urinary catheters shorten hospital stay among general hospital patients?: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, 33 2: 156-163.

Author Webster, Joan
Osborne, Sonya
Woollett, Kaylene
Shearer, Julie
Courtney, Mary
Anderson, Debra
Title Does evening removal of urinary catheters shorten hospital stay among general hospital patients?: a randomized controlled trial
Journal name Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1071-5754
1528-3976
Publication date 2006-03
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Volume 33
Issue 2
Start page 156
End page 163
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 1110 Nursing
Formatted abstract OBJECTIVE:
Literature indicates that removing urinary catheters at midnight facilitates earlier discharge among urology patients, but the effect of evening removal on the general patient population is unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate whether removing a urinary catheter at 22.00 hours compared to 06.00 hours among a general hospital population would lead to earlier hospital discharge.

DESIGN:
Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING AND SUBJECTS:

The study was conducted in a large tertiary hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Two hundred and ten general surgical and medical patients who had an indwelling catheter as part of their routine care were included.

RESULTS:
Length of hospital stay after catheter removal was not significantly affected by the timing of its removal among general hospital patients: mean hours morning 186.1; mean evening 209.3, (P = .309). In a cohort of surgical patients, the hospital stay was shorter in the evening removal group (mean hours morning 186.1; mean evening 209.3), but this result was not statistically significant (P = .127). Patients in the evening group were more likely to have a longer time period between catheter removal and the first postcatheter void, mean hours morning, 3.76 vs evening, 4.89 (t = -2.59, CI - 1.99 to -0.27). Timing of removal of the urinary catheter had no effect on the volume of the first void, mean volume morning, 214.7 mL vs evening, 221.4 mL. Twenty-five (12.1%) patients were recatheterized, but the rate of recatheterization between groups was similar. There were no differences in postdischarge problems between groups.

CONCLUSION:
Among general hospital patients, removing an indwelling urinary catheter at 22:00 hours does not shorten the length of stay and is effective in increasing the time to first void.
Keyword Hospital patients
Urinary catheters
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Nursing and Midwifery Publications
 
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