Diurnal polyp expansion behavior in stony corals may enhance carbon availability for symbionts photosynthesis

Levy, O, Dubinsky, Z, Achituv, Y and Erez, J (2006) Diurnal polyp expansion behavior in stony corals may enhance carbon availability for symbionts photosynthesis. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology, 333 1: 1-11. doi:10.1016/j.jembe.2005.11.016


Author Levy, O
Dubinsky, Z
Achituv, Y
Erez, J
Title Diurnal polyp expansion behavior in stony corals may enhance carbon availability for symbionts photosynthesis
Journal name Journal of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0981
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jembe.2005.11.016
Volume 333
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Editor Dr. P M J Herman
Dr. Sandra E. Shumway
R Hughes
Place of publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier Science Bv
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
270599 Zoology not elsewhere classified
770300 Marine Environment
Abstract Photosynthesis of zooxanthellate stony corals may be limited by inorganic carbon at high irradiances. We demonstrated that oxygen consumption of expanded corals is higher than that of contracted corals in both night-expanding and day-expanding corals. It is assumed that at the single-polyp level, the expansion of tentacles increases the surface area for solute exchange with the surrounding water, which may alleviate potential carbon limitation and excess oxygen levels in the tissue under high irradiance. We investigated this hypothesis using stable carbon isotope (613 C) analysis of coral species from the Red Sea exhibiting different morphologies. delta C-13 ratios in zooxanthellae of branched coral colonies with small polyp size that extend their tentacles during daytime (diurnal morphs) showed lower delta C-13 values in their zooxanthellae - 13.83 +/- 1.45 parts per thousand, compared to corals from the same depth with large polyps, which are usually massive and expand their tentacles only at night (nocturnal morphs). Their algae delta C-13 was significantly higher, averaging - 11.33 +/- 0.59 parts per thousand. Carbon isotope budget of the coral tissue suggests that branched corals are more autotrophic, i.e., that they depend on their symbionts for nutrition compared to massive species, which are more heterotrophic and depend on plankton predation. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Delta C-13
Corals
Polyp Behavior
Tentacle Expansion
Zooxanthellae
Ecology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Reef-building Corals
Gas-exchange
Stylophora-pistillata
Isotope Fractionation
Scleractinian Corals
Montastrea-cavernosa
Madracis-mirabilis
Anemonia-sulcata
Water Motion
Sea-anemones
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Centre for Marine Studies Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 08:38:10 EST